Central Connecticut State University

 

 

 

School of Arts and Sciences



Susan E. Pease, Dean
Richard L. Roth, Associate Dean
Stephen Adair, Assistant to the Dean
Paul Altieri, Assistant to the Dean
Mary Horan, Staff Counselor
Phone: (860) 832-2600
Fax: (860) 832-2601
Web address: http://www.ccsu.edu/artsci

The School of Arts and Sciences offers the M.A. degree in biological sciences, English, history, information design, mathematics, modern language, public history, and psychology and the M.S. in biological sciences, communication, computer information technology: computer science, criminal justice, data mining, geography, international studies, and natural sciences.

Many academic departments within the School of Arts and Sciences provide the major for the post-baccalaureate certification program for secondary school teachers.
Currently, a graduate-level Official Certificate Program is offered through the School of Arts and Sciences: the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Public Relations/Promotions. The School also contributes to the interdisciplinary Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Pre-Health Studies.

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available in each department offering a master’s degree program. Students seeking information about assistantships or program requirements should contact the academic department directly. For general information, students may call the Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences (832-2600), located in DiLoreto 112 or the School of Graduate Studies Office (832-2363), located in Barnard Hall.


ART

Faculty
Cora Marshall (Chair, Maloney 151), Meyer Alewitz, Cassandra Broadus-Garcia, James Buxton, Sherinatu Fafunwa, Sean Patrick Gallagher, Vicente Garcia, Faith Hentschel, Elizabeth Langhorne, Rachel Siporin, Mark Strathy, Ron Todd (Dept. phone: 832-2620)

Department Overview
The Department of Art offers a program of study leading to the Master of Science degree.
The M.S. in Art Education program is designed primarily to meet the needs of experienced art educators who have completed an undergraduate program in the field. The program may be available for already-certified elementary and secondary education teachers who demonstrate artistic proficiency through a portfolio review and who wish to seek additional state certification. These students may work towards the M.S. degree while they prepare to meet certification requirements in Art Education.

Admissions
In addition to fulfilling the admission requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, applicants must successfully pass a portfolio review and essay evaluation to be fully admitted into graduate programs in the Department of Art. For complete information regarding the format and content of the portfolio and essay requirements, interested applicants should visit the School of Graduate Studies’ website at www.ccsu.edu/grad  and click on “Additional Application Materials.” Interested applicants can contact the Department of Art directly at 860-832-2620.

General Portfolio Requirements for All Applicants
The portfolio must consist of 15–20 slides or digital images of the applicant’s artwork in a variety of media that demonstrate the applicant’s best studio practice. It is important that no work submitted be copied from photographs or other works of art. Multiple views are recommended for original work in sculpture, ceramics, 3D design and/or crafts.

Post-Baccalaureate Certification Portfolio Requirements
Applicants to the Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Certification program must submit a portfolio that contains examples of all of the following:
1. Still-life drawings and/or paintings that illustrate accurate depictions of form and space.
2. Landscape and/or architecture (indoor or outdoor) showing successful descriptions of form and space. These must be drawing and/or painting.
3. Images (any 2D and/or 3D) that illustrate convincing knowledge and translation of the elements and principles of design.
4. Tonal drawings in pencil, charcoal, or ink, that were executed from life and that depict figure, landscape, or still life, as well as successfully describe the illusion of light defining 3D volume.

Master of Science in Art Education Portfolio Requirements
1. Applicants for Master of Science in Art Education must submit a variety of media that demonstrate their best studio practice.
2. Applicants who intend to focus on a particular studio area, such as drawing, ceramics, or painting, should also include a series of at least five pieces that show a consistent direction, for example, invented figure compositions, portraits, landscapes and/or abstractions.

Graduate Admission Essay
Applicants must submit a completed essay describing their background and interest in the program. On the initial page, an applicant should include his or her name and the program to which he or she is applying (Master of Science in Art Education or Post-Baccalaureate). The essay should be two pages, double-spaced. In the essay, applicants should:
1. give a brief account of their background in relation to education, occupation, and activities relevant to the field of art and art education;
2. discuss the reasons for choosing an advanced degree in art, some of the ideas in which they are currently interested, and future areas they would like to explore; and
3. include a brief discussion of the work that was submitted for the portfolio review.

Where to Submit Additional Application Materials
The portfolio and essay should be sent as a package directly to the Department of Art at the same time that materials are submitted to the Graduate Admissions Office. Send the portfolio and essay package to:
Central Connecticut State University
Department of Art, Maloney Hall
RE: Graduate Admission Materials
1615 Stanley Street
New Britain, CT 06050

Program
The Art Department offers its Art Education Master’s program with a wide range of visual arts specializations. Both concepts and technical excellence are stressed. High quality resources are provided: equipment; a faculty of practicing artists, designers, and art educators; and a location convenient to major museums and numerous galleries.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ART
EDUCATION

33 credits, including thesis/Plan A or exhibition or project/Plan C

Professional Education (12 credits):
ART 500 Problems in Art Education
ART 598 Research in Art Education
ART 597 Exhibition Research (Plan C)
or
ART 599 Thesis (Plan A)
and one of the following: EDF 500, 516, 524, 525, 538, 583

Art Concentration (21 credits):
Department offerings, as approved by faculty advisor

Note: No more than nine credits at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.

DEGREE CANDIDACY
After completing 15 credits of coursework, the student must apply for Degree Candidacy. The student must present a resume, statement of purpose, and a portfolio of at least five pieces to a committee of the advisor and two other faculty members selected by the student and approved by the advisor. After 27 credits, the student must undergo a final review, including committee approval of the thesis (Plan A) or exhibition/special project (Plan C). The comprehensive exam option (Plan B) is not available. Please follow the directions on page 12 concerning the planned program.

ART EDUCATION CERTIFICATION
Persons holding a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with an art-related major or concentration must follow a planned program of graduate study leading to certification in Art Education NK-12. These candidates are required to have the equivalent of 45 credits in art-related courses and fulfill departmental admissions requirements which include a portfolio review.

POST MASTER’S STUDY
Thirty-credit planned programs of post-master’s study in specific studio areas are available with the consent of the chair.


BIOLOGY

Faculty
Jeremiah Jarrett (Chair, Copernicus 332), Douglas Carter, Tiffany Doan, Sylvia Halkin, Thomas Mione, Barbara Nicholson, Peter Osei, Clayton Penniman, Ruth Rollin, David Spector, Jack Tessier (Dept. phone: 832-2645)

Department Overview
The Department of Biology offers programs of study leading to the Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees, as well as courses which may serve as part of the general education requirement for students preparing to teach in fields other than biology. The department has a wide range of modern research equipment in laboratories designed for class and/or individual research studies. Specialized facilities available for faculty and student instruction and research include a greenhouse, herbarium, photosynthesis research laboratory, molecular genetics research laboratory, experimental gardens, controlled environment room, and growth chambers. Other shared facilities available are mouse and rat colonies, refrigerator/
freezer room, and a computer laboratory.
Through the academic and extracurricular opportunities which the department offers, students are prepared to understand and participate in a wide variety of biological specializations. Students in the graduate programs are expected to expand their understanding of biological concepts, to become familiar with recent developments in biology and to become familiar with library, computer, and laboratory resources for biological research.

Admission Requirements
The following items are required:
• application for admission to graduate study
• official transcripts from all institutions in which undergraduate and graduate work has been taken
• graduate Record Examination scores for the aptitude and advanced biology tests are recommended but not required
• narrative statement
• letters of recommendation by three college instructors familiar with your ability and record in biology and the related sciences

The first three items above are to be submitted to the School of Graduate Studies Office. When an applicant’s admission folder is complete, it will be forwarded to the department chair. The last two items above should be submitted to the department chair. The Departmental Graduate Committee will make a recommendation for acceptance. Students who are accepted will be assigned a program committee at the time of acceptance. If applicable, a thesis advising committee will be assigned after the student begins the program of study.

Programs
MASTER OF ARTS IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
The master of arts programs provide study in the biological sciences for those graduate students desiring to major in biology. The programs are designed to fulfill the educational needs of biologists who desire further specialization and/or knowledge of recent advances in the field; students who seek a subject matter concentration as an intermediate step toward preparation for work at the doctoral level; and teachers who are interested in specializing in a particular area, or updating their knowledge within the discipline of biology. Specialization may be in such areas as botany, zoology, physiology, ecology, and environmental studies. Each student will be assigned a graduate committee whose function will be to help the student plan a sound program.

Note: Additional work, as described in the course syllabi, will be required for graduate credit in 400-level courses. Students may take no more than nine credits of 400-level courses.

Biological Sciences: General Program
There are two options (Plan A and Plan B) leading to the Master of Arts degree, both of which require 30 credits.
Both Plan A and B require BIO 500 and 540 in addition to 19–20 credits of directed electives in biology or related fields as approved by advisor. Plan A also requires BIO 599 (6 credits) and thesis defense or BIO 598 (3 credits) and 599 (3 credits) and thesis defense. Plan B requires 3 credits in BIO 590 and/or BIO 591, and BIO 598 (3 credits) and a comprehensive exam.

Biological Sciences: Ecology and Environmental Science
30 credits


Biology Course Component (24 credits):
(1) BIO 500 Seminar in Biology (1 credit), and BIO 515 Foundations of Ecology (3 credits), and BIO 540 Topics in Advanced Biology (3–4 credits), with a topic focus appropriate to the specialization (may be repeated with different topics). (2) Biology electives: 16–17 additional credits in biology or related fields approved by an Ecology and Environmental Science Advisor. Appropriate courses in the biology electives may include:
BIO 508 Coastal Ecology 3
BIO 509 Coastal Ecology Laboratory 1
BIO 520 Plant Ecology 3
BIO 540 Topics in Advanced Bio. 3–4
BIO 590 Focused Study in Advanced Biology 1–4
BIO 598 Research in Biology 3
BIO 405 Ecology 4
BIO 410 Ecological Physiology 4
BIO 420 Ornithology 4
BIO 425 Aquatic Plant Biology 4
BIO 434 Ecology of Inland Waters 4
BIO 436 Environmental Resources and Management 3
BIO 438 Aquatic Pollution 4
BIO 440 Evolution 3
BIO 444 Plant Taxonomy 3
BIO 480 Animal Behavior 3
BIO 488 Animal Behavior Laboratory 2

Capstone Component (6 credits, students may select Plan A or Plan B).
Plan A: Option 1, BIO 599 Thesis (6 credits) and thesis defense or Option 2, BIO 599 Thesis (3 credits) and thesis defense, and BIO 598 Research in Biology (3 credits).
Plan B: Three credits in BIO 590 and/or BIO 591, and BIO 598 (3 credits) and a comprehensive exam.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
The M.S. Anesthesia and the Health Sciences Specialization are for students enrolled in the anesthesia program or allied health fields. Dr. Rollin is program coordinator for Anesthesia and Health Sciences.
The General Program is for biology and science teachers and all others who wish to expand their background in the broad area of biology or who wish to specialize in a particular aspect of this discipline. Students who as undergraduates majored in areas other than biology may also pursue a master’s degree in this program.
The planned program of graduate study will be developed by a student and his or her advisor and will be based upon the student’s undergraduate record and educational needs. Thesis and non-thesis programs are available to students in all programs, except the Health Sciences specialization. Non-thesis programs will require a comprehensive examination.

Note: Additional work, as described in the course syllabi, will be required for graduate credit in 400-level courses. Students may take no more than nine credits of 400-level courses.

Biological Sciences: General Program
30 credits
This program is for teachers and others interested in a master’s degree with a professional education component. Other courses may be substituted for the professional education component with the advisor’s approval.

Professional Education (6–9 credits):
One of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues
EDF 516 School and Society
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum
EDF 525 History of American Education
EDF 538 The Politics of Education
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education
and
Additional course(s) as approved by advisor

Biology Requirements (4–5 credits):
BIO 500 Seminar in Biology
BIO 540 Topics in Advanced Biology

Directed Electives (10–17 credits):
In biology or related fields as approved by advisor

Research (3–6 credits):
Plan A: BIO 599 Thesis (6 credits) and thesis defense or BIO 598 Research in Biology and BIO 599 Thesis (3 credits) and thesis defense
or
Plan B: BIO 598 Research in Biology and comprehensive exam.

Biological Sciences: Anesthesia
31–33 credits
Coordinator: Ruth Rollin

Professional Education (6 credits):
ED 511 Principles of Curriculum Dev.
EDL 513 Supervision

Major Field Requirements (21 credits):
BIO 416 Immunology
BIO 500 Seminar in Biology
BIO 517 Human Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology
BIO 518 Applied Physiology
BIO 528 Pharmacology
CHEM 550 Basic Organic and Biological Chemistry

Research (4–6 credits):
Plan A:
BIO 598 Research in Biology
BIO 599 Thesis (3 credits)
and thesis defense
or
Plan B:
BIO 590 Focused Study in Advanced Biology
BIO 598 Research in Biology
Comprehensive exam

Note to prospective anesthesia students: The student must be a licensed registered nurse and satisfactorily complete the program of study in anesthesia at an affiliated hospital-based school of nurse anesthesia which includes 1000 hours of clinical practicum. Admission to this program is contingent upon admission to one of the following affiliated schools:
New Britain School of Nurse Anesthesia, New Britain, CT: John Satterfield, M.D., medical director, and Joan Dobbins, M.S., CRNA, program director.
Hospital of St. Raphael, New Haven, CT: Philip J. Noto, M.D., medical director, School of Anesthesia; and Judy Thompson, M.S., CRNA, program director.
Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, Pawtucket, R.I.: Peter Baziotis, M.D., medical director, School of Anesthesia; and Mark Foster, M.A., CRNA, program director.

Biological Sciences: Health Sciences Specialization
30–31 credits


Professional Education (6 credits):
ED 511 Principles of Curriculum Development
EDL 513 Supervision

Major Field Requirements (18–19 credits): BIO 412 Human Physiology
BIO 413 Human Physiology Laboratory
BIO 500 Seminar in Biology
BIO 518 Applied Physiology
BIO 528 Pharmacology
CHEM 454 Biochemistry
or
BMS 506 Biosynthesis, Bioenergetics and Metabolic Regulation
or
CHEM 550 Basic Organic and Biological Chemistry
Biology Elective (choose from BIO 416, 540, 590, 591; BMS 497, 505, 506, or 562)

Research (6 credits):
BIO 599 Thesis (6 credits) and thesis defense
or
BIO 598 Research in Biology and BIO 599 Thesis (3 credits) and thesis defense

CERTIFICATION IN BIOLOGY FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION
The Department of Biology also evaluates undergraduate and graduate preparation of applicants to the biology certification program in secondary education. This evaluation is done through interviews and/or review of transcripts of prospective candidates who have been admitted to the graduate program. Transcripts are forwarded to the department chair by the School of Education and Professional Studies. The chair of biology or a departmental designee will make recommendations for courses to be completed in the biological area of the student’s program. Admission to the Professional Program is contingent on recommendation by the Department of Biology in addition to completion of other requirements.

OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM:
POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN PRE-HEALTH STUDIES

The Department of Biology contributes to the interdisciplinary Post-baccalaureate Certificate in Pre-Health Studies, a non-degree program designed for college graduates whose undergraduate background does not yet meet the requirements for admission to professional schools of medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, or other related fields. The CCSU Pre-Health Professions Advisory Committee (Pre-PAC) is responsible for admitting students to this program and for individually advising them upon entry. Both the Pre-PAC and this Official Certificate Program are described in more detail on page 77.


COMMUNICATION

Faculty
Serafin Mendez-Mendez (Chair, Robert C. Vance Academic Center 317), Jose Carlos Del Ama, Robert Fischbach, Glynis Fitzgerald, Yanan Ju, Andrew Moemeka, Christopher Pudlinski, Karen Ritzenhoff, Benjamin Sevitch, Jeffrey B. Teitler, Cornelius Benjamin Tyson, Cindy White (Dept. phone: 832-2690)

Department Overview
Graduate study in communication provides students with academic experiences that enable them to evaluate, develop, shape and change the communication environment within organizations (internal communication) as well as between organizations and their target audiences (external communication). Students will learn to understand communication processes, internal and external to an organization; employ research methods in the diagnosis of communication problems within organizations and between organizations and their target audiences, including those resulting from intercultural differences; apply problem-solving, decision-making and negotiation strategies in complex relational situations within organizations; examine the use and impact of information and communication technologies in the design and evaluation of strategic communication campaigns and other organizational applications; and develop and practice sound and ethical reasoning.

Programs
THE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMMUNICATION
33 credits

The Master of Science program comprises two sections, a 15-credit core of foundational courses and 18 credits of advisor-approved directed electives. A capstone experience consisting of Plan A (6-credit Thesis) or Plan B (Comprehensive Examination) or Plan C (Special Project) is required for graduation. Program requirements and electives are provided below.

Core Courses (15 credits):
COMM 500 Introduction to Graduate Studies in Communication
COMM 501 Theories of Human Communication within an Organizational Context
COMM 503 Research Methods in Communication
COMM 505 Persuasive Communication
COMM 504 Organizational Communication Audits
or
COMM 507 Campaign Planning and Evaluation

Directed Electives (12–18 credits):
Students will select from the following courses approved by the faculty advisor. A planned program of study should be completed no later than 6 credits into the student’s program. The student may specialize in either track or may select courses from both tracks. To specialize in a particular track, at least 3 courses must be selected from that particular track.

Organizational Communication Track
COMM 450 Communication Skills for Training and Development
COMM 504 Organizational Communication Audits
COMM 522 Corporate Communication
COMM 551 Policy Issues in Organizational Communication
COMM 562 Communication and High-Speed Management

Public Relations Track
COMM 451 Environmental Communication
COMM 454 Communication and Social Change
COMM 506 Principles and Processes of Communication Campaigns
COMM 507 Campaign Planning and Evaluation
COMM 508 Public Relations Writing Strategies

General Electives
COMM 543 Intercultural Communication
COMM 544 Strategies in Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
COMM 585 Special Topics
COMM 590 Independent Study

Outside Courses
AC 510 Accounting and Control
IT 464 Six Sigma Quality
IT 500 Industrial Applications of Computers
IT 502 Human Relations and Behavior in Complex Organizations
IT 564 Quality Systems Management
STAT 453 Applied Statistical Inference

Capstone (0–6 credits):
Plan A: COMM 590 Independent Study (3 credits) and COMM 599 Thesis (3 credits)
or
Plan B: Comprehensive Examination
or
Plan C: COMM 597 Special Project (3 credits)

To complete degree requirements, students have the option of a thesis (Plan A) or a comprehensive examination (Plan B) comprised of a written exam followed by an oral exam or a Special Project (Plan C). Programs will be designed jointly by the departmental advisors and the students to provide the greatest educational and career opportunities.

OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM: POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC RELATIONS/PROMOTIONS
This non-degree certificate program, offered by the Department of Communication, is designed for college graduates wishing to expand or update their knowledge of public relations/promotions, but who are not ready to commit to a graduate program leading to a master’s degree. The program provides students with a formal option for post-baccalaureate studies. Courses completed as part of this certificate program may later be applied to the department’s master program if admission requirements for that program are successfully met.

Program Requirements
The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in Public Relations/Promotions will require the student to complete a four-course, 12-credit sequence consisting of COMM 505 Persuasive Communication, COMM 506 Principles and Processes of Communication Campaigns, COMM 507 Campaign Planning and Evaluation, and COMM 508 Public Relations Writing Strategies. One other course from the department’s master’s degree program in communication can be substituted for one of the four courses listed above with permission of the student’s academic advisor. More information about these courses can be found at www.communication.ccsu.edu/grad.htm. The student must achieve a 3.00 (B) GPA in order to receive the post-baccalaureate certificate. Up to 12 credits may be applied to the M.S. in Communication degree; admissions to the M.S. is required.

Admission
Students seeking admission to the M.S. in Communication program must present an undergraduate average of B (3.00). Students with an undergraduate GPA of 2.70 through 2.99, or who have been out of school for five years and possess significant professional experience, may apply to be considered for conditional acceptance.
Students who meet the above requirements should submit an Application for Graduate Admission, official copies of transcripts, and their application fee directly to the School of Graduate Studies Office. A current resume, a writing sample comprised of 500 to 1,000 words which expresses their goals for graduate study and future professional aspirations, and names and contact information (including e-mail addresses) of three references should be sent directly to the chair of the Department of Communication. No action will be taken until all of the above materials have been received.


COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Faculty
Computer Science: Joan Calvert (director MSCIT), Bradley Kjell, Neli Zlatareva (phone: 832-2710)
Management Information Systems: Marianne D’Onofrio, Michael Gendron (phone: 832-3297)
Computer Electronics and Graphics Technology: Veeramuthu Rajaravivarma, Karen Coale Tracey (phone: 832-1830)
(website: www.cs.ccsu.edu/cit/index.htm)

Overview
The Master of Science Computer Information Technology program is offered by the Department of Computer Science, in conjunction with the Computer Electronics and Graphics Technology Department, School of Technology, and the Management Information Systems Department, School of Business. For details of the program, see page 75 of this catalog.


CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Faculty
Stephen Cox (Chair, Vance 410), Matthew Atherton, Kathleen Bantley, Alison Cares, Julie Kiernan Coon, Ronald Fernandez, Jennifer Hedlund, Damon Mitchell, Shamir Ratansi, Raymond Chip Tafrate (Dept. phone: 832-3005)

Overview
The Master of Science degree provides students with the knowledge and skills required for leadership positions in the criminal justice system and continued study at the doctoral level. The Criminal Justice Graduate Program strongly emphasizes the application of theory and research in executive decision-making, policy development and analysis, and the treatment of offenders. While all graduate students are required to complete core courses, students are allowed to select elective courses that match their individual academic and career interests.
Admission to the Master of Science degree program in Criminal Justice is made on a competitive basis two times per year. Applications for the fall semester must be completed and received by May 1. Applications for the spring semester must be completed and received by December 1. The number of students accepted in any semester is dependent on available openings in the program, which may fluctuate from semester to semester.
Applicants will be notified by May 30 (for fall admission) and December 30 (for spring admission) regarding acceptance decisions. Some applicants who are not accepted into the program may be put on a waiting list. Applicants on the waiting list may be admitted as additional openings in the program become available. Applicants accepted into the program will be contacted and asked to confirm their intentions to enter the program. Newly admitted applicants who do not register for courses by June 20 (for fall admission) and January 10 (for spring admission) risk losing a spot in courses because enrollment may be made available to students on the waiting list.
In addition to standard University graduate admission requirements, the department requires:
1. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale
2. One undergraduate social science research methods course with a grade of
“C” or better
3. One undergraduate elementary statistics course with a grade of “C” or better
4. A formal application essay that focuses on (a) academic and work history, (b) reasons for pursuing graduate studies in criminal justice, and (c) future career goals
5. Resume
Consideration in the admissions process is given to selecting applicants from diverse areas of the criminal justice field (e.g., law enforcement, corrections, alternative sanctions, treatment and rehabilitation, and analysis). Students who do not meet these requirements may request consideration for admission with special requirements. No students may register for graduate-level criminal justice courses without first being admitted to the program.

Program
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The Criminal Justice graduate program requires 30 credits of course work, including five core courses, three elective courses, and a capstone project.

Core Courses:
CJ 501 Proseminar on the Nature of Crime 4
CJ 510 Proseminar on Law and Social Control 4
CJ 520 Proseminar on the Administration of Justice 4
CJ 533 Research Methods in Criminal Justice 3
CJ 534 Quantitative Analysis in Criminal Justice Research 3

The core courses are designed to help students 1) understand the purpose and function of criminal justice agencies organized under the rubrics of police, courts, and corrections; 2) critically analyze the organizational effectiveness of criminal justice agencies; 3) understand how society comes to define certain behaviors as criminal and how these definitions can be effected by the race, gender, and socio-economic status of the lawmaker, as well as the lawbreaker; 4) assess the effectiveness of criminal justice policies and programs through the application of research methods, statistics, and criminological theory; and 5) understand the root causes of crime and the effects of social, economic, political, psychological, and biological factors on crime.

Elective Courses (choose three):
CRM 450 Drugs and Society 3
CRM 475 Controlling Anger and Aggression 3
CJ 525 Program Planning and Evaluation 3
CJ 530 Offender Profiles 3
CJ 535 Correctional Counseling 3
CJ 539 Delinquency and Control 3
CJ 540 Assessing and Developing Performance in Criminal Justice Organizations 3
CJ 560 Sexual Offending 3
CJ 575 Organizational Development and Evaluation of Criminal Justice Organizations 3
CJ 580 Public Policy in the Criminal Justice System 3

Elective courses are designed to allow students to develop knowledge and skills in areas that specifically match their individual academic and career interests. Students desiring a concentration in behavioral sciences and the offender are encouraged to consider courses such as CRM 450, CRM 475, CJ 530, CJ 535, CJ 539, and CJ 560. Students desiring a concentration in organizational functioning are encouraged to consider courses such as CJ 525, CJ 540, CJ 575, and CJ 580.

Capstone Project (choose one):
CJ 597 Agency Collaborative Project 3
CJ 599 Thesis 3

The capstone project is an original piece of research conducted by the student and completed under the supervision of a faculty advisor.

Note: No more than nine credits at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.


DESIGN (Graphic/Information)

Faculty
Susan Vial (Chair, Vance 324), Joan Calvert (Computer Science), Eleanor Thornton (Design), C. Benjamin Tyson (Communication) (Dept. phone: 832-2557)

Department Overview
The Department of Design (Graphic/Information) provides an academic structure for the advancement of graphic and information design studies and degrees at the University. The department was established to promote professional studies in the expanding areas of graphic design, website design, multimedia design and digital imaging. Faculty members have backgrounds in graphic design, fine art, advertising, illustration, communication, marketing, computer science, management information systems, website design, multimedia design and CD-ROM presentation.

Program Overview
The study of information design at CCSU includes the design of traditional graphic (print) material as well as other forms of digital information, including website design and multimedia design. Graduates are expected to take leadership positions in the design industry, including graphic design, publishing, advertising, multimedia design, web design, digital imaging, and corporate information design.
The degree program is unique in curriculum and structure, including course work in design practice, marketing, management, computer applications, design theory, research methods, history of design and internship. The program, similar to the actual practice of design, addresses not only the theoretical, creative and technical aspects of visual design, but business applications as well. This unique degree program promises to deliver graduates who will meet and exceed the challenges of this rapidly evolving field.

Facilities
The Department of Design maintains state-of-the-art computer laboratories and a print center that are dedicated to various aspects of design study. Faculty and staff with professional software training and design background operate these facilities.

Admission Requirements
Applicants for the Master of Arts degree in Information Design must hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education. The undergraduate record must demonstrate clear evidence of ability to undertake and pursue successfully advanced study in the graduate field.
In addition to standard University graduate admission requirements, the Department of Design requires that successful applicants submit the following materials to the Admissions Office:
1. Minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale.
2. 12 credits of undergraduate course work in graphic design with a grade of “B” or better, of which three credits must be at the 400 level. These courses will be reviewed by the department for discipline-specific content as it relates to the M.A. in Information Design.
3. Application essay.
4. Slide or CD-ROM portfolio (10 examples of applicant’s design work). The portfolio must meet department admissions committee approval for design quality. Collaborative projects must be clearly identified as such and include a detailed description of each student’s contribution.

Note: Successful applicants will be expected to take a technical competency test prior to admission to DES designated courses requiring computer use.

Program
MASTER OF ARTS IN INFORMATION DESIGN
36 credits

Core Courses (21 credits):
MKT 470 Marketing Communications Campaigns
MGT 552 Management Theory and Practice
DES 499 Computer Applications for Graphic/Information Design
DES 501 Graphic/Information Design Theory I
DES 502 Graphic/Information Design Theory II
DES 520 Advanced History of Design
DES 598 Research Methods in Design

Specialization (9 credits):
DES 503 Graphic/Information Design Practice I
DES 504 Graphic/Information Design Practice II
DES 537 Advanced Design Internship

Directed Elective (3 credits):
DES, MIS, CS, COMM, MGT, MKT, BUS or ART course as approved by advisor

Capstone (3 credits):
DES 597 Research Project (Plan C)

Note: Students enrolled in the following courses will be assessed a $65 Design Lab Fee: DES 436, 438, 439, 465, 498, 499, 503, 504, 597, 598. Contact the department for additional information.

Note: Students are limited to six credits of DES designated course work per semester without permission of advisor and department chair.

Note: No more than nine credits at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.


ENGLISH

Faculty
Gilbert Gigliotti (Chair, Willard 304), Stuart Barnett, Burlin Barr, Candace Barrington, Anthony Cannella, David Cappella, Matthew Ciscel, Stephen Cohen, Robert Dowling, Christine Doyle, Robert Dunne, Brian Folker, Jaclyn Geller, Susan Gilmore, Heidi A. Hartwig, Thomas Hazuka, John A. Heitner, Beverly A. Johnson, Jason Jones, Paul Karpuk, Eric Leonidas, Vivian Martin, Melissa A. Mentzer, Mary Anne Nunn, Steven D. Ostrowski, Laurence Petit, Aimee Pozorski, Rae C. Schipke, Ravi Shankar, Katherine Sugg, Leyla Zidani-Eroglu (Dept. phone: 832-2740)

Department Overview
The Department of English offers graduate study leading to a Master of Science Degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL); a Master of Arts degree in English; Certification in English; adult-level certification in TESOL; and Pre-K–12 certification in TESOL.

Admission Requirements
English
To qualify for the Master of Arts degree program in English, an applicant must have a baccalaureate degree in English or American literature or a closely related field from an accredited college or university, or 30 hours of appropriate undergraduate course work in the discipline (as approved by departmental review). Additional undergraduate credits will be required of students who lack sufficient preparation in literature. Applicants must have a GPA of at least 3.00 on a four-point scale both in overall undergraduate and (if applicable) graduate course work and in English courses. Conditional admission may be offered to students who do not meet all of these requirements. Applicants must also submit the following:
To the Graduate Admissions Office:
• Graduate Application Form
• Official undergraduate and (if applicable) graduate transcripts from every institution attended except CCSU
• Application fee
To the English Department (Attn. Chair, English Graduate Committee), at the same time that application materials are submitted to the Graduate Admissions Office:
• Letter of application detailing reasons for wishing to pursue graduate study in English
• Two letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or professional work
• A writing sample of 10–15 pages showcasing the applicant’s strongest analytical or critical writing about literature. Work written for previous courses is acceptable (indeed encouraged), but “creative” pieces (poetry, fiction, or memoir) are not appropriate.

No applications will be considered until all materials have been received. Applications will be evaluated by the department on an ongoing basis.

TESOL
To qualify for the Master of Science degree program in TESOL, an applicant must have completed three credits of study in a second language (non-native speakers of English may use English to satisfy this requirement). Students lacking this background may be admitted conditionally but will be required to complete the three credits of a second language study before graduation from the program.

Students in the degree programs will be assigned an English Department advisor appropriate to their areas of study. Before degree candidates register for course work they should read the program brochure appropriate to their programs. Degree-track students should consult with their assigned advisors at the start of their programs and should file a planned program before completing 16 credits of graduate course work. M.A. in English students should consult “Graduate Programs in English”; TESOL candidates should consult “Pre-Professional and In-Service Programs in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.” Additional information may be obtained from the advisor and in this catalog under General Information.

Programs
The Master of Science degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a plan of study especially designed for those students with an interest in language and linguistics who wish to work with non-English speaking students here or abroad.
The Master of Arts degree in English is offered to students who wish to devote their program exclusively to the advanced study of English and American literature. The Master of Arts diploma specifies a graduate degree in English, a prerequisite for further graduate work in English.
Certification in English is a non-degree program offered to persons with a bachelor’s degree (normally in English) whose undergraduate course work does not meet State of Connecticut certification requirements for secondary English teachers. Courses taken to complete certification requirements may not be used to complete the English Department’s M.S. or M.A. degree programs. A minimum of six credits in English at CCSU is required before student teaching.
Certification in TESOL is a non-degree program offered to persons with a bachelor’s degree. Certification may be obtained for adult-level ESL or for the Pre-K–12 level.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (TESOL)
This program offers Plan A (33 credits plus a thesis) and Plan B (36 credits and a comprehensive examination).

TESOL Specialization (21 credits):
LING 400 Linguistic Analysis
LING 496 TESOL Methods
LING 497 Second Language Acquisition
LING 512 Modern Syntax
LING 513 Modern Phonology
LING 515 An Introduction to Sociolinguistics
One course from:
LING 533 Second Language Composition
LING 535 Second Language Testing
LING 596 TESOL Practicum

Research (3 credits):
LING 598 Research in TESOL and Applied Linguistics

Professional Education (6 credits):
One of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues
EDF 516 School and Society
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum
EDF 525 History of American Education
EDF 538 The Politics of Education
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education
and
Additional course at the 500 level as approved by advisor

All planned programs and course sequences must be approved by a TESOL advisor prior to registration.
Plan A: Students may elect Plan A only with the approval of an advisor in the program. Plan A students take LING 599 Thesis plus one general elective. Plan B students take two general electives. General electives are graduate course offerings as approved by the student’s advisor, courses drawn from the departments of Anthropology, English or another Modern Language, Geography, History, Humanities, Political Science, or other relevant fields.
It is expected that a degree candidate will have control of the English language beyond mere communicative adequacy. It shall be the joint decision of the TESOL faculty whether a degree candidate’s control of spoken and/or written English is appropriate to the profession. The faculty will recommend various remedies for any candidate whose control of English is deemed deficient.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH
30 credits


Plan A (Thesis)
ENG 598 Research in English* 3
ENG 500 Seminar in American Literature 3
ENG 501 Seminar in British Literature 3
3–4 500-level English electives as approved by the faculty advisor 9–12
2–3 400-level English electives as approved by the faculty advisor 6–9
ENG 599 Thesis 3

Plan B (Comprehensive Examination)
ENG 598 Research in English* 3
ENG 500 Seminar in American Literature 3
ENG 501 Seminar in British Literature 3
4 500-level English electives as approved by the faculty advisor 12
3 400-level English electives as approved by the faculty advisor 9

*To be completed during the first year of graduate study.


GEOGRAPHY

Faculty
Brian Sommers (Chair, DiLoreto 208), Richard Benfield, Charles Button, D’Arcy Dornan, John Harmon, Peter Kwaku Kyem, Cindy Pope, Timothy Rickard, Xiaoping Shen, David Truly (Dept. phone: 832-2785)

Department Overview
Central Connecticut State University has the oldest and largest graduate program in geography in Connecticut. The graduate program was initiated in 1962 with a Master of Science in Social Science for in-service teachers who desired to complete the requirements for their permanent teaching certificates. However, the program’s emphasis has changed since state approval was granted in 1976 to offer a Master of Science in Geography. Since that time, students have used the latter degree in the pursuit of a variety of career goals.
Geography is the science of location. The geography faculty teaches students how to use effectively maps and air photos, gather information about places, and make computer analyses. Students use this knowledge to learn about how people use the land in different places, and what impacts humans.
The Department of Geography has fully equipped cartography, air photo interpretation and microcomputer laboratories available for student use. The microcomputer lab includes a network of IBM Pc-compatible computers, to include an extensive software collection along with digitizers and plotters for automated cartography, computer graphics and geographic information systems. CCSU has a map depository for the Defense Mapping Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey, with close to 30,000 sheets in our collection. The department also receives planning reports, maps and documents from cities, towns and regions throughout the Northeast.
In addition the Department of Geography provides internships and part-time employment for students in a variety of town, regional, state, and private planning agencies and offers consulting services, workshops and short courses as part of its outreach program.

Programs
GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
The M.S. in Geography has been used as a springboard by those interested in further graduate study. Several graduates have gone on to Ph.D. programs at major universities. However, most graduate students are interested in using the M.S. in Geography as a terminal degree that will prepare them for careers in several technical areas.

ADMISSIONS STANDARDS
The M.S. degree programs are available to all individuals who meet the admissions requirements. The Graduate Record Examination is not an admission requirement. An undergraduate major or minor in geography is desirable but not required of applicants. However, those with deficient academic preparation may be asked to complete up to four courses of remedial work at the undergraduate level. Details are available from the Department of Geography.

PROGRAM OF STUDY
Students enrolled in the graduate program must comply with all requirements in the current graduate catalog.
M.S. in Geography. Students pursuing this degree may select Plan A, B, or C.
Plan A, which requires 30 credits, includes a thesis (GEOG 599); 12 credits of core courses, including GEOG 500, 514 or 516 or 518, 530 or 542, 598; 9–12 credits of geography electives selected in consultation with an advisor; and 3–6 credits of electives selected from other disciplines in consultation with an advisor. Thesis guidelines are available from the appropriate dean’s office.
Plan C, which also requires 30 credits, includes a special project (GEOG 595) instead of a thesis.
Others may select Plan B, in which a comprehensive exam is completed instead of a thesis. The 30 credits required are the same as in Plan A, except that GEOG 595 is substituted for GEOG 599 in Plan C and GEOG 597 is substituted for GEOG 599 in Plan B.
Program Specializations — Students enrolled in the M.S. in Geography program may specialize in any of the following areas:
• urban and regional planning
• environmental studies
• travel and tourism
• cultural and world regional geography
• computer mapping or geographic information systems
Each graduate student’s planned program of graduate study is custom designed to provide the best possible preparation for the career selected, and can include practical work experience to apply classroom theory.

CERTIFICATION
Graduate study in geography does not lead to teacher certification.

ADVISEMENT
Contact the chair in DiLoreto 208 (832-2785), or write to the:
Department of Geography
Central Connecticut State University
New Britain, CT 06050 U.S.A.


HISTORY

Faculty
Glenn Sunshine (Chair, DiLoreto 206), Jay Bergman, M. B. B. Biskupski, Gloria Emeagwali, Leah Glaser, Briann Greenfield, Katherine Hermes, Mark Jones, Elias Kapetanopoulos, Mary Ann Mahony, Norton Mezvinsky, Heather Munro Prescott, John Tully, Matthew Warshauer, Louise Williams, Robert Wolff (Dept. phone:
832-2800)

Department Overview
The Department of History provides an M.A. degree in history and an M.A. degree in public history. The department, in cooperation with other departments in the social science areas, offers various programs for teachers and presents courses for the general education of graduate students in other fields of specialization.
Admission to the degree programs in the department requires the prerequisite of an undergraduate history major or its equivalent, generally interpreted as 30 credits in history and closely related fields. A graduate student lacking this prerequisite will be required to take courses for undergraduate credit to make up any deficiency.
Each student taking a major or a concentration in history will be assigned to a graduate advisor who will assist the student in designing the planned program of graduate study. All graduate student planned programs in history require the approval of the advisor and department chair.

Admission Requirements
To be considered for admission to the M.A. in history or the M.A. in public history, applicants must have an undergraduate or cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher, as well as a degree in history or related field. Applicants who do not meet these admissions standards, but who have an undergraduate or cumulative GPA between 2.70 and 2.99, may be considered for conditional admission. In order to be recommended for full acceptance, conditionally admitted students must complete HIST 501 with a B or better.
Students who do not meet the undergraduate GPA requirements for admittance or conditional admittance to the graduate program in history may take up to three courses (nine credits) in graduate-level history courses as a non-matriculated student. Those earning a minimum 3.30 GPA for these courses may apply for conditional admittance to the graduate program. Those students must also provide two letters of recommendation from CCSU History Department faculty. Once conditionally admitted, those students who achieve a B+ or above in HIST 501 will be fully admitted into the program.
Prospective graduate students without an undergraduate degree in history, but who meet the GPA requirements for full admission to the graduate program, should meet with the History Department chair or a History Department graduate advisor to determine the requisite courses needed for admission. At minimum, those students will receive a conditional admittance and must complete HIST 501 with a B or better.
For consideration, all application materials must be received by the Department of History no later than December 1 for spring admissions and May 1 for fall admissions. Applicants who do not meet the fall admissions deadline may enroll in courses on a non-matriculated basis, subject to course availability.
Applicants should submit the following materials to the Graduate Admissions Office:
• the application for Graduate Admission
• official copies of transcripts
• application fee

In addition, applicants must submit the following materials to the History Department:
• two letters of recommendation (recommendation forms are available at www.ccsu.edu/grad/Additional_Material/Hist_rec.html )
• a statement of purpose describing the applicant’s academic interests in history, not to exceed 350 words. Applicants for the M.A. in public history should also address their professional goals and career aspirations.

Programs
MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY
30 credits, including a thesis


Admission criteria: Acceptance into the CCSU Graduate Program and approval of the History Department.

Three 500-level history courses (9 credits)
Three additional history courses (including HIST 501) (9 credits)
HIST 599, Thesis (6 credits)
Electives in related fields (6 credits)

Candidates will be required to demonstrate the ability to translate material in their field in one foreign language, except in those cases where, upon the request of a candidate in U.S. history, a substitute skill or subject is approved by the department. Candidates must make application in the department to take the language examination. Deadlines are October 10, for the fall examination; March 10, for the spring.
The fields of concentration available in the M.A. program are U.S. history, European history, and comparative world history. No more than nine credits can be taken at the 400 level.

MASTER OF ARTS IN PUBLIC HISTORY

Public history is the practice of history outside academia and the classroom setting. Career opportunities for public historians are diverse and include positions in museums, film and television, the tourism industry, and the government, as well as at historic sites. Public historians make the messages or lessons of the past accessible to a broad general audience and relevant to a wide range of people. By applying their skills in the non-academic world they provide a service to the community as a whole.
CCSU Master of Arts program in public history provides students with the academic background, job specific skills, and hands-on experience necessary to work in a variety of public history jobs or to bring the benefits of public history into their classroom teaching on the K–12 level.
For more information, visit the public history website at: www.history.ccsu.edu/
ma_pubhist.html.

33 credits, including an internship and project (Plan C)

Admission criteria: Acceptance into the CCSU Graduate Program and approval of the History Department.

Public history courses required (graduate courses specific to public history) (18 credits):
HIST 501 Historiography 3
HIST 510 Seminar in Public History 3
HIST 511 Topics in Public History (taken twice with different topics) 6
HIST 521 Public History Internship 3
HIST 595 Public History Research Project (Plan C) 3

Three general history courses to be taken from the following list (9 credits):
HIST 560 Seminar in American History
HIST 565 Seminar in 17th- and 18th-Century America
HIST 566 Civil War and Reconstruction in the U.S.
HIST 570 Immigration in American History
HIST 540 Seminar in European History

Two electives (6 credits), chosen in consultation with an advisor. At least three of these credits must be taken in a discipline other than history.

CERTIFICATION
The Department of History in cooperation with the School of Education and Professional Studies offers courses of study leading to secondary teacher certification in history and in history and social studies. Information about current Connecticut teacher certification requirements may be obtained from the Office of the Dean, School of Education and Professional Studies.

POST-MASTER’S STUDY
Individually designed 30-credit programs of post-master’s study are available for qualified students.


MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES

Faculty
Timothy Craine (Chair, Marcus White 108), Frank Bensics, Roger Bilisoly, Nelson Castaneda, Yuanqian Chen, Robert Crouse, Darius Dziuda, Ivan Gotchev,
S. Louise Gould, Philip Halloran, Chun Jin, Robin S. Kalder, Dix Kelly, Daniel Larose, Sally Lesik, Eran Makover, Jeffrey McGowan, Adele Miller, Daniel S. Miller, Maria Mitchell, Narasimhachari Padma, Luis Recoder-Núńez, Thomas Roman, Krishna Saha, David Smith, Charles Waiveris (Dept. phone: 832-2835)

Department Overview
The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers programs leading to the Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees. Master of Arts candidates may specialize in mathematics, computer science, statistics, or actuarial mathematics. Master of Science candidates may pursue a program for certified elementary or secondary school teachers or enroll in the data mining program. Students may also enroll in a program leading to certification to teach mathematics at the secondary level.

Programs
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS FOR CERTIFIED ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
(Plans A and C are offered as options. No more than nine credits at the 400 level may be counted toward the degree.)

Professional Education (3 credits):
One of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues
EDF 516 School and Society
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum
EDF 525 History of American Education
EDF 538 The Politics of Education
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education

Elementary/Middle School Mathematics Education Core (12 credits):
Elementary school track:
MATH 506 Teaching Number Concepts in the Elementary Grades
MATH 507 Teaching Geometry and Measurement in the Elementary Grades
MATH 508 Teaching Probability and Statistics in the Elementary Grades
MATH 509 Teaching Algebraic Thinking in the Elementary Grades
or
Middle school track:
MATH 536 Teaching Number Concepts in the Middle Grades
MATH 537 Teaching Geometry and Measurement in the Middle Grades
MATH 538 Teaching Probability and Statistics in the Middle Grades
MATH 539 Teaching Algebraic Thinking in the Middle Grades

Mathematics Electives (6 credits):
Choose two courses from
MATH 449 Mathematics Laboratory for Elementary School
MATH 504 Topics in Mathematics
MATH 534 Techniques in Diagnosis and Remediation for the Teaching of Mathematics K–12
MATH 580 Directed Study in Mathematics
STAT 453 Applied Statistical Inference

General Electives (6 credits):
Courses chosen from the electives listed above, graduate education courses and MATH 531, as approved by faculty advisor.

Research (3 credits):
MATH 598 Research in Mathematics Education

Capstone:
Plan A: 33 credits consisting of 30 credits from the above listings plus MATH 599 (3 credit Thesis).

Plan C: 33 credits consisting of 30 credits from the listings above plus MATH 590 Special Project in Mathematics (3 credits).

Note: Once a graduate student has elected one of the two plans, A or C, any change to the other plan must be made prior to the completion of 21 graduate credits and requires the approval of the student’s advisor and the Dean, School of Graduate Studies.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS FOR CERTIFIED SECONDARY TEACHERS
(Plans A and C offered as options. No more than nine credits may be earned in 400-level courses.)

General Education Electives (3 credits):
As approved by faculty advisor

Educational Foundations (3 credits):
Chosen from EDF 500, 516, 524, 525, 538 or 583

Secondary Mathematics Education (9 credits):
MATH 547 plus 6 credits chosen from MATH 504, 534, 540, 543, 544 and 580

Mathematics and Statistics Content
Courses (12 credits):
No more than six credits in courses with the STAT designation. One course must be STAT 453 unless this course was taken as an undergraduate. Courses to be chosen from MATH 421, 440, 468, 469, 470, 477, 491, 515, 516, 519, 520, 523, 525, 526, STAT 453, 455, 567

Research in Mathematics Education (3 credits): MATH 598

Capstone:
Plan A: 33 credits consisting of 30 credits from the above plus MATH 599 (3 credit thesis)

Plan C: 33 credits consisting of 30 credits from the above plus MATH 590 (3 credit-Special Project)

Note: Once a graduate student has elected one of the two plans, A or C, any change to the other plan must be made prior to the completion of 21 graduate credits and requires the approval of the student’s advisor and the Dean, School of Graduate Studies.

MASTER OF ARTS IN MATHEMATICS
This program is designed for those students who wish to expand their knowledge of mathematics beyond the level of undergraduate study, either as preparation for advanced graduate study or to increase their knowledge of mathematics for teaching, or to combine a knowledge of higher mathematics with related mathematical sciences and computer science for a career in industry.
Applicants to the Master of Arts program are expected to have completed the equivalent of MATH 152, 221, 222, 228 and 366 in addition to any necessary prerequisites for courses required in the planned program of graduate study.

M.A. Program in Mathematics—General
30 credits


Requirements (18 credits):
MATH 515 Abstract Algebra I
MATH 516 Abstract Algebra II
MATH 519 Principles of Real Analysis I
MATH 520 Principles of Real Analysis II
MATH 523 General Topology
MATH 526 Complex Variables

Electives as approved by faculty advisor (12 credits). These may include 3 credits for the thesis for a student electing Plan A. No more than 9 credits may be earned from 400-level courses.

Capstone Experience:
Plan A: Thesis (MATH 599, 3 credits). Students electing this option must also pass one qualifying examination* in an area not related to the thesis topic.
Plan B: Comprehensive Exam. Students selecting this option must pass two of three qualifying examinations* (in the areas of algebra, analysis, or topology) and also give oral presentations on a topic approved by their advisor.

* Students must apply for qualifying examinations after completing appropriate coursework with the approval of their advisors. Applications are available in the School of Graduate Studies or on the web at www.ccsu.edu/grad under Graduate Forms (Degree Candidacy/Non Capstone Qualifying Form).

M.A. Program in Mathematics with Specialization in Computer Science
30 credits


The student will choose a specialization in computer programming techniques and numerical methods or computer systems and software engineering. The student and faculty advisor will work out an appropriate plan of study within the framework of the following requirements.

Requirements:
Basic Mathematics Courses (12 credits) — Three (3) of MATH 515, 516, 519 and 520; and one (1) of MATH 523, 526 and STAT 551.

Electives appropriate to the area of specialization as approved by the faculty advisor (18 credits); no more than nine of these credits may be earned in 400-level courses.

Comprehensive Examination

M.A. Program in Mathematics with Specialization in Actuarial Science
(Plans A, B and C are offered as options.)


The student and faculty advisor will work out an appropriate plan of study within the framework of the following requirements.

Requirements:
Actuarial Core (8 credits): Actl 565 and 566

Additional courses as approved by the advisor, including:
a. 9 credits chosen from ACTL 480, 481, 482, 580,
b. 9 credits designated STAT or MATH at the 400 or 500 level, and
c. 1–4 additional credits in actuarial science, mathematics, or statistics.
No more than nine credits in the program may be earned in 400-level courses.

Capstone:
Plan A: Thesis (Math 599, 6 credits) with 27 credits of course work
Plan B: Comprehensive Exam with 30 credits of course work
Plan C: Special Project in Mathematics (MATH 590, 3 credits) with 30 credits of course work

M.A. Program in Mathematics with Specialization in Statistics
(Plans A, B and C are offered as options.)


The student and faculty advisor will work out an appropriate plan of study within the framework of the following requirements.

Requirements:
Statistics Core (6 credits): STAT 567 and 575

Three courses chosen from ACTL 565, 566; MATH 470, 477, 519, 520; STAT 551 (9–11 credits)

Electives appropriate to the area of specialization (10–15 credits): No more than nine credits in the program may be earned in 400-level courses.

Capstone:
Plan A: Thesis (Math 599) (6 credits) with 27 credits of course work
Plan B: Comprehensive Exam with 30 credits of course work
Plan C: Special Project in Mathematics (MATH 590) (3 credits) with 30 credits of course work

Note: Once a graduate student has elected one of the three plans A, B or C, any change to one of the other plans must be made prior to the completion of 21 graduate credits and requires the approval of the student’s advisor and the Dean, School of Graduate Studies.

MASTER of SCIENCE IN DATA MINING
Admission Requirements

The minimum required undergraduate GPA for prospective candidates for the Master of Science in data mining is 3.00. Conditional admission may be granted to candidates with undergraduate GPAs as low as 2.40, conditioned on a student receiving no grades lower than an A- in the first three core courses in the program.
The following materials are required, in addition to the materials required by the School of Graduate Studies.
1. A formal application essay of 500–1000 words that focuses on (a) academic and work history, (b) reasons for pursuing the Master of Science in data mining, and (c) future professional aspirations. The essay will also be used to demonstrate a command of the English language.
2. A detailed, itemized letter explaining whether and how the candidate has fulfilled each of the program prerequisites that applicants to the Master of Science in data mining program are expected to have completed, or be in the process of completing:
• MATH 221 Calculus II;
• STAT 315 Mathematical Statistics I; and
• a second-semester course in undergraduate statistics. Students may be admitted on condition that they complete these prerequisite courses with a grade of B or better. These prerequisite courses are regularly offered in the classroom, and some may be offered online, for students who are missing one or more of these courses.
In their letters, candidates are asked to show which courses on which transcripts are being used to fulfill each of these prerequisites. In particular, the candidate is asked to consider that mathematical statistics is calculus-based and represents a different approach beyond the usual undergraduate statistics course. Therefore, a course description or syllabus for the mathematical statistics course should be attached to the letter. If a candidate has not had courses that would fulfill certain program prerequisites, the candidate should so indicate. The candidate is reminded that conditional admission may be granted for students needing to complete any or all of the program prerequisites.
3. Two letters of recommendation, one each from the academic and work environment (or two from academia if the candidate has not been employed).

The application and all transcripts should be sent to the Graduate Admissions Office. The deadline for submitting applications for the fall semester is May 1. The other materials, including the formal application essay, the prerequisites letter, and the two letters of recommendation, should be sent to:
Dr. Daniel T. Larose
Re: MS in Data Mining Admissions Materials
Department of Mathematical Sciences
Marcus White 118
Central Connecticut State University
New Britain, CT, 06050

Note: Only hard copy materials are acceptable. No attachments to e-mails or other electronically transmitted material will be considered in admissions decisions.

M.S. in Data Mining
36 credits

Core Courses (27 credits)
The following courses are required of all students. (All courses three credits unless otherwise indicated.)
STAT 416 Mathematical Statistics II
STAT 521 Introduction to Data Mining (4 credits)
STAT 522 Data Mining Methods (4 credits)
STAT 523 Applied Data Mining (4 credits)
STAT 525 Web Mining
STAT 526 Data Mining for Genomics and Proteomics
STAT 527 Text Mining
STAT 570 Applied Multivariate Analysis

Thesis Course (3 credits)
STAT 599 Thesis
All students must elect capstone Plan A, thesis. Students must make a presentation of their thesis on the CCSU campus. Students who cannot come to campus must make a web presentation of their thesis.

Elective Courses (6 credits)
Choose any two courses from the following list:
CS 570 Topics in Artificial Intelligence
CS 580 Topics in Database Systems and Applications
STAT 455 Experimental Design
STAT 529 Current Issues in Data Mining
STAT 551 Applied Stochastic Processes
STAT 567 Linear Models
STAT 575 Mathematical Statistics III
Other appropriate graduate course, with permission of advisor

Note: New students may take the first course in the program while working on the prerequisites for the more advanced courses.

Note: No more than nine credits at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.

ACCELERATED TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM IN SECONDARY MATHEMATICS
35 credits


Admission criteria:
a) The candidate must qualify for admission to the University’s graduate programs, including a 2.70 minimum GPA.
b) The candidate must have completed at least 30 credits in mathematics content courses.
c) The candidate must meet all requirements for admission to the Professional Program for Teacher Education, including passing scores on Praxis I or waiver and an interview with and a positive recommendation by the Acceptance Committee of the Department of Mathematical Sciences.

Required courses: EDF 415,* RDG 504, EDTE 315,* EDSC 425,* EDSC 435,* SPED 501, MATH 413,* MATH 426,* MATH 543, MATH 544.

* No credit toward a graduate degree

Students may also take up to nine credits in graduate-level mathematics courses to complete as much as 21 credits toward a M.S. degree in Secondary Mathematics during this 14-month program. A maximum of nine credits at the 400 level may be counted toward the M.S. degree, upon approval by the faculty advisor.


MODERN
LANGUAGES


Faculty
Lilián Uribe (Chair, Davidson 212), Louis Auld, Gloria Caliendo, Edward Force, Antonio García-Lozada, Paloma Lapuerta, Cheng Sing Lien, Gustavo Mejía, Ángela Morales, Maria Passaro, Carmela Pesca, Shizuko Tomoda (Dept. phone: 832-2875)

Department Overview
The Modern Languages Department offers Master of Science and Master of Arts degree programs for teachers and other qualified persons wishing to pursue language, culture, and literature work on the graduate level. Its offerings are also available to non-degree candidates possessing the prerequisites for any given course.
Students who specialize in a modern language will develop with their advisor a program of study that takes into consideration their educational background and degree of competency in the language.
Students interested in a program leading to certification to teach language in the elementary and secondary schools may consult the Office of the Dean of Education and Professional Studies.
Information about foreign language proficiency tests may be obtained from the Modern Languages Department.

Graduate Certification in French, German, Italian, and Spanish
Students seeking certification to teach a foreign language must:
• apply to the Graduate Admission Office as a non-degree graduate student seeking certification. Once accepted to the School of Graduate Studies, determination is made for a plan of study;
• have an interview with the departmental committee to assess oral competency and gain acceptance into Professional Program; recommendations are made by committee to the School of Education and Professional Studies;
• complete the equivalent of an undergraduate major (36 credits), professional core requirements and student teaching block. Students with insufficient undergraduate preparation must make up deficiencies by taking at least two courses at the graduate level. These courses do not count toward a graduate degree.

Programs
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN SPANISH FOR CERTIFIED TEACHERS
30 credits (Plan A or B)


Elementary or secondary school teachers electing a specialization in Spanish are expected to have a baccalaureate degree, with at least 24 credits of the language in college or equivalent preparation, before being admitted to this program.
Before admission for the degree, students must contact the department for evaluation of their competence in listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Spanish.

Professional Education (6–9 credits):
One of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues 3
EDF 516 School and Society 3
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum 3
EDF 525 History of American Education 3
EDF 538 The Politics of Education 3
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education 3
and
Additional course(s) as approved by advisor

Core (6 credits):
SPAN 560 Structure of Spanish Language 3
ML 598 Research in Modern Languages (must be completed within the first 15 credits of planned program) 3

Directed Electives (9 credits):
One culture/civilization course and two literature courses as approved by advisor

Electives (3–9 credits):
As approved by advisor

Capstone (0–3 credits)
SPAN 599 (Plan A) or Comprehensive Examination (Plan B)

Note: A maximum of nine credits at the 400 level is allowed.

MASTER OF ARTS IN MODERN LANGUAGE
Applicants for this degree program should have a baccalaureate degree with a minimum of 24 credits preparation in each language in which graduate work will be undertaken. Only French, Spanish, or Italian may be chosen as the language of specialization. With approval of the advisor, candidates with sufficient background in a second language may be permitted to include up to two appropriate graduate courses in this language in their program. Certified teachers whose oral and proficiency skills are of sufficient caliber may include up to six credits in professional education in their program.
Before being admitted, candidates must contact the department for evaluation of their graduate-level competence in speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing in each language to be included in the program.

Note: No more than nine credits at the 400 level may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.

Specialization in French
30 credits (Plan A or Plan B)

Note: The University is currently not accepting applications to the Master of Arts in Modern Language, specialization in French.

Core (6 credits):
FR 460 Advanced Grammar and Composition 3
ML 598 Research in Modern Languages 3

Directed Electives (15 credits):
Literature — Choose 12 credits from FR 521, 532, 553, 561, 573
Culture and Civilization — FR 472 or 588

Electives (6–9 credits):
Selected in consultation with advisor

Capstone (0–3 credits):
FR 599 (Plan A) or Comprehensive Examination (Plan B)

Note: A maximum of nine credits at the 400 level may be included, with approval of faculty advisor, in the planned program of study.

Specialization in Spanish
30 credits (Plan A or Plan B)


Core (6 credits):
SPAN 560 Structure of Spanish Language 3
ML 598 Research in Modern Languages 3

Directed Electives (15 credits):
Literature — Choose 12 credits from SPAN 515, 520, 525, 526, 530, 535, 545, 551, 553, 571, 572, 576
Culture and Civilization — SPAN 534 or 588 or ML 550

Electives (6–9 credits):
Selected in consultation with advisor

Capstone (0–3 credits):
SPAN 599 (Plan A) or Comprehensive Examination (Plan B)

Specialization in Italian
30 credits (Plan A or Plan B)

Core (6 credits):
ML 598 Research in Modern Languages ITAL 460 Advanced Written Italian

Directed Electives (15 credits):
Option 1
Four literature courses as approved by advisor. Select from:
ITAL 470 14th-Century Italian Literature
ITAL 476 16th-Century Italian Literature
ITAL 561 Topics in Italian Literature (may be repeated up to 3 times with different topics)
ITAL 571 20th-Century Italian Literature
and
one culture and civilization course:
ITAL 588 Topics in Italian Cultural Studies (may be repeated up to 3 times with different topics)

Option 2
ML550 Intensive Studies in Modern Languages (6 or 9 credits) (may be repeated up to 3 times with different topics)
and
6 or 9 credits selected from Option 1

Electives (6–9 credits):
Courses as approved by advisor, including but not restricted to: ITAL 588, ITAL 488, ITAL 561, ITAL 588, IS 590, IS 596

Capstone (0–3 credits):
Plan A (3 credits): Thesis (ITAL 599)
or
Plan B: Comprehensive Examination

Note: A maximum of nine credits at the 400 level is allowed.

Specialization in Hispano-North American Inter-University Master’s Degree in Spanish Language and Hispanic Cultures
30 credits (Plan A or B)


Students must complete nine credits of their planned program of studies at the University of Salamanca during a six-week summer session.

Core (6 credits):
SPAN 560 Structure of Spanish Language 3
ML 598 Research in Modern Languages 3

Directed Electives (15 credits):
Literature — Choose 12 credits from SPAN 515, 520, 525, 526, 530, 535, 545, 551, 553 571, 572, 576
Culture and Civilization — Choose 3 credits from SPAN 534, 588, ML 550

Electives (6–9 credits):
Selected in consultation with advisor.

Capstone (0–3 credits):
SPAN 599 (Plan A) or Comprehensive Examination (Plan B).

Note: Nine credits will be transferred as substitutes from the University of Salamanca as electives.

ACCELERATED TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM IN SPANISH
45 credits


Admissions criteria: B.S. degree in Spanish; minimum 2.70 GPA; satisfactory completion of Praxis I or waiver.

Summer One (10 credits): EDF 415, EDT 315, ML 428, ML 490 (or, if taken in fall or spring, LING 300)

Fall (13 credits): EDTE 315, EDSC 425, ML 429, Spanish course at 400/500 level*

Spring (10 credits): EDSC 435, ML 440

Summer Two (12 credits): RDG 504, SPED 501, 2 Spanish courses at 400/500 level*

*Certification requirements such as PSY 236 or HIST 261/262 may need to be taken instead of the Spanish courses. A description of ML 429 may be found in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Note: In consultation with a graduate advisor, some credits from ML 428, ML 490, RDG 504 and SPED 501 may be applied as electives toward M.S. Program. ML 428 and ML 490 are the only 400-level courses that may be applied to the M.S. in Spanish, with approval of the advisor.


Music

Faculty
Daniel D’Addio (Chair, Welte 212), Brian Kershner, Carl Knox, Linda Laurent, Charles Menoche, N. Carlotta Parr (Coordinator of Graduate Studies, Welte 210), Pamela Perry, Julie Ribchinsky, Thomas Seddon (Dept. phone: 832-2912)

Department Overview
The Department of Music offers a variety of programs in music education for the graduate student by qualified faculty of diverse training and expertise. In addition to the faculty listed above, the department has an outstanding part-time faculty of professional musicians, many from the Hartford and New Haven symphonies, who teach applied music and related subjects.
The Summer Music Institute (SMI) offers graduate courses in music education taught by both resident and guest faculty members. A brochure of the SMI program is available each year in March (860-832-2912). Information about SMI can also be found on the department’s website at http://www.music.ccsu.edu.
Programs of study in music education include an M.S. degree, certification program, and the post-master’s planned program.

Programs
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC
EDUCATION

The M.S. in Music Education is designed to provide the certified music teacher with professional training beyond the baccalaureate degree in music education, performance, composition, music theory, and music history. The student in the M.S. in Music Education program must complete Plan B—Comprehensive Exam and either Plan A—Thesis or Plan C—Special Project, both of which total 33 credits. Students selecting Plan C may complete either MUS 500 or MUS 597.
In addition to the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, application to the Department of Music requires the
following:
• An application to the Department of Music
• An essay*
• A portfolio*
• A theory examination**
• Evidence of proficiency in technology***
• A Personal Interview

*For essay and portfolio requirements, refer to the Department of Music’s website at http://www.music.ccsu.edu or call Dr. N. Carlotta Parr, Coordinator of Graduate Studies, at (860) 832-3317.

**While this examination is primarily a placement examination, a low score could influence the decision about an applicant’s acceptance.

***If a candidate does not provide evidence of proficiency in technology (notation and sequencing), he/she will be required to take a notation or sequencing course as one of his/her electives (at least two credits).

Requirements
General Education (0–6 credits):
Elected with advisor’s approval

Professional Education (3–9 credits):
One of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues 3
EDF 516 School and Society 3
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum 3
EDF 525 History of American Education 3
EDF 538 The Politics of Education 3
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education 3
and
up to 6 additional credits, to be selected with advisor’s approval.

Music (15–27 credits):
MUS 470 Musical Structure and Style
MUS 509 Comparative Music Studies
MUS 504 Principles and Foundations of Music Education
MUS 510 Current Issues in Music Education
MUS 598 Research in Music Education
Up to 12 credits of advisor-approved electives in music education or music

Culminating Project (0–3 credits):
Plan B: Comprehensive Exam*
and one of the following:
Plan A: MUS 599 Thesis
Plan C: MUS 500 Project in Music
Plan C: MUS 597 Performance Recital
Plan C: MUS 597 Conducting Recital

*All students must take the Comprehensive Exam, as well as one of the other capstone options.

Note: Students enrolled in the following courses will be assessed an Applied Music Fee — $200.00 for 1/2 hour lesson (MUS 577) and $400.00 for full hour lesson (MUS 578). Contact the Department for additional information.

Note: No more than six credits at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.

CERTIFICATION IN MUSIC EDUCATION
A student who holds a bachelor’s degree but who is not certified in music education may apply for acceptance into the graduate certification program. Upon satisfactory completion of a musicianship exam and audition, the student will consult with the chair of the Department of Music in order to establish a planned program for certification. Course work used to gain certification may not be used toward a graduate degree program. Students must meet all requirements for admission to the professional program in the School of Education and Professional Studies. For information on admission to the professional program, see page 53.
In addition to the requirements of the School of Graduate Studies, application to the Department of Music requires the following:
• A completed application form to the Department of Music
• An essay*
• An audition*
• A theory examination**
• A personal interview

*For essay and audition requirements, refer to the Department of Music’s website at http://www.music.ccsu.edu or call (860) 832-2912.

** While this examination is primarily a placement examination, a low score could influence the decision about an applicant’s acceptance.

POST-MASTER’S STUDY IN MUSIC EDUCATION
Music educators with a master’s degree may apply for acceptance into post-master’s study. Upon satisfactory completion of a musicianship exam, students will be assigned an advisor to assist in designing a 30-credit planned program.


NATURAL SCIENCES

Faculty
Faculties of the departments of Chemistry (Dept. phone: 832-2675) and Physics and Earth Sciences, including Science Education (Dept. phone: 832-2930). See departmental listings for details.

Overview
Track I provides for advanced study in physics or earth sciences. Track II is for certified teachers in elementary and secondary schools. This program is developed on an individual basis according to goals identified by the student and the advisor. Track III provides for advanced study in chemistry.

Note: The University is currently not accepting applications to the Master of Science in Natural Sciences, specialization in Chemistry.

Program
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL SCIENCES
30 credits


Core Requirements:
SCI 500 Science, Technology and Society
Either Track I, Track II or Track III

Track I: Physics or Earth Science
Specialization (12–24 credits):
Courses in either Physics or Earth Science as approved by advisor

Cognate (0–12 credits):
Courses in a related field or fields as approved by advisor

Research/Capstone (3–9 credits):
Research (PHYS 598 or ESCI 598) and/or Thesis (PHYS 599 or ESCI 599)

Plan A or Plan B can be chosen.

Track II: Science Education Specialization (for Certified Elementary and Secondary School Teachers)
Professional Education (6–9 credits):
One of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues
EDF 516 School and Society
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum
EDF 525 History of American Education
EDF 538 The Politics of Education
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education
and
Additional courses as approved by advisor

Science (15–18 credits):
Science courses as approved by advisor

Research (6 credits):
SCI 595 Special Projects in Science Education
SCI 598 Research in Science Education

Note:
Plan A: 30 credits, including three credits of Thesis (SCI 599)
Plan E: 33 credits

Track III: Chemistry Specialization
Note: The University is currently not accepting applications to the Master of Science in Natural Sciences, specialization in Chemistry.

Specialization:
15 credits in Chemistry (12 credits must be at the 500 level)

Cognate (6 credits):
Select 6 credits from BIO, CHEM, EDF*, ESCI and PHYS

Capstone (6 credits):
CHEM 599 Thesis (Plan A)

*One of EDF 500, 516, 524, 525, 538, 583, as approved by advisor.

Note: No more than nine credits at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.

POST-MASTER’S STUDY
Thirty-credit planned programs of post-master’s study are available for elementary teachers and secondary school science teachers.


PHYSICS AND EARTH SCIENCES

Faculty
Ali A. Antar (Chair, Copernicus 50601), Marsha Bednarski, Mark Evans, Kristine Larsen, Peter LeMaire, Deborah McGregor, Steven B. Newman, Nanjundiah Sadanand, Nimmi Parikh Sharma, Luisito Tongson, Michael Wizevich (Dept. phone: 832-2930)

Department Overview
Located in Copernicus Hall, the facilities of the Physics and Earth Sciences Department include numerous introductory and intermediate/advanced laboratories as well as two teaching laboratories, an observatory containing a 16-inch telescope, a 100-seat planetarium, and a 400-kv Van de Graaff linear accelerator. The fully equipped weather center includes a National Weather Service Facsimile System, Internet capability, two rooftop satellite data retrieval systems and a fully operational color Doppler weather radar monitoring system.
In addition to teaching, the faculty pursue many areas of interest including: atomic collisions; solid state; general relativity; astrophysics; ground water pollution; public planetarium productions; lunar, planetary and deep sky observing; weather forecasting and analysis, and climatology of thunderstorm and hurricane activity in Connecticut; science education, particle physics, applied holography, and general relativity. Wherever possible, students enrolled in programs are encouraged to join with the faculty in their ongoing studies in these and other areas.
The department offers specializations in the Master of Science in Natural Sciences. For details of the program, see the Natural Sciences major on page 48 of this catalog.


POLITICAL SCIENCE

The Department of Political Science does not offer a graduate program, but an agreement between the University of Connecticut and Central Connecticut State University makes it possible for qualified undergraduate students at CCSU to enroll in up to four graduate-level courses in UConn’s Master of Public Administration program and later apply these credits toward the M.P.A. Part-time students who have a bachelor’s degree may take up to three courses at the graduate level before applying for the M.P.A. program. UConn M.P.A. students may take approved courses at CCSU’s campus. There is some exchange of faculty between the two schools. Questions about the specifics of the cooperative program should be addressed to the M.P.A. director at UConn or to the chair of the Political Science Department at CCSU.
CCSU courses that have been approved for credit toward the M.P.A. are the following:
PS 446 The Budgetary Process
PS 448 The Politics of Human Services
Outside of the M.P.A. program, courses numbered 400 or higher which are offered by the department and listed elsewhere in this catalog may be included on planned programs of graduate study if approved by the student’s advisor and the appropriate dean.


PSYCHOLOGY

Faculty
Bradley Waite (Chair, Marcus White 209), Carrie Andreoletti, Carol Shaw Austad, Laura Bowman, Paul Chu, James Conway, Joanne DiPlacido, Francisco Donis, Douglas Engwall, Carolyn Fallahi, Marianne Fallon, Carol Ford, Marc Goldstein, Steven Horowitz, Laura Levine, Charles Mate-Kole, Lauren Perdue, Moises Salinas, Marisa Tomalá-Mealy, Rebecca Wood (Dept. phone: 832-3100)

Department Overview
The Department of Psychology offers the Master of Arts in Psychology with options for a general psychology program or a specialization in community psychology or health psychology. The specialization in community psychology emphasizes primary prevention. The department also offers courses to meet general elective requirements of graduate students in other disciplines, and courses for liberal arts graduates who are preparing for teacher certification.
Each student in the M. A. program will be assigned an advisor who will assist the student in developing an approved program.

Programs
MASTER OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY
The M.A. programs in psychology can be designed to prepare students for careers in the field of human services or as preparation for further graduate study. The programs require 36 to 42 credits of course work including a thesis. A common core of 18 credits is required for all students. Students also must elect either the general psychology program option or the specializations in community psychology or health psychology.
All programs are planned with the assistance of a graduate advisor.
The specialization in Health Psychology is designed to prepare students for careers in the field of health psychology; the focus of the specialization in Community Psychology is on primary prevention, where students are trained to be active practitioners in the prevention field. The General Psychology, community Psychology, and Health Psychology options are intended for full- or part-time students. Most courses are offered in the evening.
The Psychology Department may be contacted for full information concerning these programs. For admission, a B.A. degree with a minimum of 18 credits in psychology is preferred; courses in statistics and research methods, with a minimum grade of B, are required. A minimum undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 and a 3.00 in psychology courses, three letters of reference (at least two from academic sources) and a personal statement are required. Application deadline for spring admission is December 1, and April 25 is the deadline for fall admission.

M.A. Program
36 credits, including thesis

Common Core for all M.A. students
(18 credits):
PSY 512 Seminar in Developmental Psychology
PSY 545 Introduction to Clinical Psychology
PSY 550 Introduction to Community Psychology
PSY 596 Psychological Research: Design and Analysis I
PSY 597 Psychological Research: Design and Analysis II
PSY 599 Thesis (defense required)

General Psychology Program
36 credits

Common Core (18 credits)
Directed electives as approved by advisor (18 credits)

Specialization in Community Psychology
36 credits

Common Core (18 credits)
Specialization
PSY 551 Primary Prevention
PSY 553 Developing Prevention Programs
PSY 595 Graduate Internship in Psychological Applications
Directed electives as approved by advisor (9 credits)

Specialization in Health Psychology
42 credits


Common Core (18 credits)
Specialization:
PSY 541 Health Psychology
PSY 542 Psychology of Stress
PSY 543 Stress Management: Theory and Research
PSY 530 Psychopathology
PSY 551 Primary Prevention
PSY 595 Graduate Internship in Psychological Applications

Choose 2 additional electives (6 credits) from the following: PSY 458, 526, 546, 553, 571, 590, 591.

Note: A maximum of six credits at the 400 level may be included, with approval of faculty advisor, in the planned program of study.


SCIENCE EDUCATION

Faculty
Marsha Bednarski (Coordinator, Physics and Earth Sciences Dept., Copernicus 532; 832-2943)

For details of the program, see Natural Sciences: Track II on page 48 of this catalog.

POST-MASTER’S STUDY
Thirty-credit planned programs of post-master’s study are available for elementary teachers and secondary school science teachers.


SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES CENTERS

The Copernican Planetarium and Observatory (Copernicus Hall) includes a full-function, optical planetarium, which seats 108 people and is used for classes and programs for the community. The observatory, located on the roof of Copernicus Hall, is used for astronomical instruction for Physics and Earth Sciences classes. It also supports student research in astronomical photography and observation using a modern 16-inch Casegrain reflector and other telescopes.

The Institute for Science Education, coordinated by the Department of Biological Sciences, offers summer courses for middle, junior high, and high school science teachers. The Partners in Science program for middle school students presents interdisciplinary explorations of science in Saturday morning workshops. Science faculty and students work with middle and secondary school teachers on topics to enhance pre-college science preparation and encourage students to pursue careers in science.

The Multimedia Language Learning Center (Barnard 336) provides students with state-of-the-art technology for language study and cultural enrichment. The lab is equipped with audio, film, video and laser disc technology and a scanner, as well as web-capable computers for interactive learning.

The Polish Studies Center (DiLoreto 208-23) was established in an effort to foster within both the Polish-American and the American communities an awareness of Poland’s culture, history, and civilization. In 1997 Connecticut’s first, and New England’s second, Endowed Chair in Polish and Polish-American Studies was established at CCSU. The Polish Studies Center offers courses in Polish history, politics, culture and civilization, language, and the Polish community in America. The Center’s other resources include the Polish Heritage Book Collection, the Connecticut Polish-American Archive, the Annual Fiedorczyk Lecture in Polish-American Studies, the Milewski Polish Studies lecture, the Godlewski Evening of Polish Culture, educational materials for teachers, movies, exhibits and scholarship aid for Polish-American students and for students pursuing Polish Studies.

The Copernicus Science Computing Laboratory, located in the Francis J. Rio Interdisciplinary Science Center (Copernicus 227), serves the faculty and students in the natural and physical sciences. The Computing Lab houses 20 networked PCs and Macs, as well as two laser printers, two inkjet printers, a scanner and a multimedia projector.

The Weather Center is a fully functional weather forecasting facility, including a satellite downlink to the National Weather Service, computer data retrieval capability, color weather radar and satellite access. It supports forecasting for the University community as well as faculty and student research in the atmospheric sciences.

The Writing Center (Willard 305) provides one-to-one tutorials and small-group workshops to help members of the CCSU community improve their writing in areas such as drafting compositions, preparing research papers and taking essay exams. Appointments for tutorials are available Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. by calling 832-2765.

 

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