Central Connecticut State University

 

 

 

School of Education and Professional Studies



Mitchell Sakofs, Acting Dean
Anne Pautz, Assistant Dean
Phone: (860) 832-2100
Fax: (860) 832-2109
Web address: http://www.ccsu.edu/education

The mission of the School of Education and Professional Studies is to prepare leaders for service in our communities. It does this through Post Baccalaureate graduate programs that lead to Connecticut teacher certification as well as Masters degree, Sixth-Year Certificate, and Doctorate programs that provide advanced certification and professional development to education and counseling professionals. Programs allow students with a strong liberal arts and content area background to acquire the professional knowledge and skills necessary to practice in their chosen field.

Programs in the School of Education and Professional Studies are accredited by the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE), Connecticut State Department of Education, and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). In addition, the School of Education and Professional Studies is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education and an active participant on the Teacher Education Council of State Colleges and Universities (TECSCU).

The education programs also hold national recognitions from the following NCATE affiliated organizations: Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI), Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), Educational Leadership Constituent Consortium (ELCC), International Reading Association (IRA), National Association for Sports and Physical Education (NASPE), National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS), and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

In addition to providing rigorous graduate programs, faculty from the School of Education and Professional Studies and affiliated public schools have established a network of Professional Development Schools (PDS). These PDS provide exemplary clinical sites for teacher candidates, enhance pupil learning, and provide sites for action research. The School also operates campus-based centers that provide services to the community. These partnerships allow the School to provide students and community members with outstanding educational opportunities and services.

Below is an overview of centers and graduate Post-Baccalaureate, degree, and post-Masters programs, as well as the departments where they are located.

Counseling and Family Therapy
• Master of Science in Counselor Education with specializations in:
School Counseling
Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling
Student Development in Higher Education
• Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy
• Advanced Official Certificate Program in Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling

Educational Leadership
• Master of Science in Educational Leadership
• Master of Science in Technology Education
• Sixth-Year Certificate: Intermediate Administrator or Supervisor
• Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership
• Advanced Official Certificate Program in Superintendent of Schools

Physical Education and Human Performance
• Master of Science in Physical Education
• Post Baccalaureate Program for Physical Education teacher certification

Reading and Language Arts
• Master of Science in Reading and Language Arts
• Sixth-Year Certificate: Reading and Language Arts Consultant
• Advanced Official Certificate Program in Reading and Language Arts

Special Education
• Master of Science in Special Education
• Post-Baccalaureate program for Special Education teacher certification

Teacher Education
• Master of Science in Early Childhood Education
• Master of Science in Elementary Education
• Master of Science in Foundations: Policy or Secondary Education Strands
• Post-Baccalaureate program for Elementary Education teacher certification
• Post-Baccalaureate programs for secondary education teacher certification areas
• Post-Baccalaureate programs for all-level teacher certification areas

Title II Reporting
Federal Title II of the Higher Education Act of 1998 mandates that institutions of higher education that have teacher preparation programs must report the pass rates on certification tests for their program completers. Any institution that has been identified as “low performing” by the State must also report this designation to the public.

CCSU defines “program completer” as a student who has met the academic requirements of the Professional Program for Teacher Certification. The students who formed the 2004–2005 cohort (the most recent, as of June 2006) of program completers finished a rigorous program of study that is widely recognized for its quality and is nationally accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Students completed subject/content area requirements equivalent to non-education majors in the same fields. In addition, students received a thorough grounding in pedagogy and extensive school-based field experiences to prepare them to be educational leaders in the learning communities of Connecticut. There were 273 program completers identified in the 2004–2005 cohort. They took a total of 970 individual Praxis tests, passing 961 of those tests. This yielded a summary institutional passing rate of 97%, comparable to the statewide rate of 98%.

Post-Baccalaureate Programs for Teacher Certification
Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may pursue teacher certification through our Post-Baccalaureate Certification programs. These programs prepare students for teacher certification and do not result in a master’s degree. Students can seek certification in the following fields:
• Elementary Education
• Secondary Education in the following subjects: biology, business, chemistry, earth sciences, English, French, general science, German, history/social studies, Italian, mathematics, physics, and Spanish
• Pre-Kindergarten/Kindergarten through grade 12 (PK/K–12) Education in the following subjects: art, music, physical education, special education, TESOL, and technology education

Admission to the Post-Baccalaureate Certification programs involves two distinct application processes. First, students must apply to the School of Graduate Studies through the CCSU Graduate Admissions Office. Students are admitted to the School of Graduate Studies at the pre-certification level and begin the program at this level. Once students have begun the program, they then apply for admission to the Professional Program for Teacher Certification through the Office of the Dean of Education and Professional Studies. Students admitted to the Professional Program for Teacher Certification are designated certification candidates. Registration for professional-level education courses is restricted to students admitted to the Professional Program for Teacher Certification.

The Professional Program for Teacher Certification applications are located outside of Barnard Hall, Room 248. Applications to the Professional Program for Teacher Certification are processed twice a year. Submission deadlines are September 10 and February 10. The Professional Program Application has complete instructions about requirements for each program. Criteria for admission to the Professional Program include admission to a post-baccalaureate graduate program, current enrollment in classes at CCSU, an overall undergraduate Grade Point Average (GPA) from all institutions attended of 2.70 GPA, passing scores or a waiver for the Praxis I tests, an additional complete set of official transcripts (transcripts submitted to Graduate Admissions cannot be used), letters of reference addressing the students’ potential as teachers, an essay, and other program-specific materials listed on the application. Students also must participate in a Professional Program interview. The application review and admission process takes from 6 to 8 weeks and is completed before pre-registration for the following semester.

The Connecticut State Department of Education will issue a Praxis I waiver based on specific SAT, ACT, or PAA scores. Testing and waiver requirements are subject to change by the State of Connecticut without prior notification. Information about the waiver application and criteria for receiving a Praxis I waiver are available at Barnard 248 or from the Connecticut State Department of Education at http://www.ctcert.org/ . Information on registering for the Praxis tests are also available at Barnard 248 or from Educational Testing Service at www.ets.org . Students should allow 10–12 weeks to receive Praxis I scores or waivers.

Program Planning. Post-baccalaureate students must meet all course and laboratory requirements specified in particular teacher education programs. Students in post-baccalaureate certification programs also are required to satisfy certain general education and subject matter major requirements, regardless of their bachelor’s degree area.
A transcript evaluation is completed for each student to identify the specific courses that must be completed for certification. A “Planned Program” is prepared for the student based on this evaluation. Once the appropriate deans sign the Planned Program, it becomes the official program for the student. Planned Programs are subject to change based on changes in state certification regulations.

• Connecticut certification regulations are subject to change without notice to students. These changes can impact the official Planned Program. Students must meet the certification regulations in place at the time they apply for certification, regardless of what their Planned Program required. Students are responsible for insuring that their Planned Program meets all certification requirements that will be in effect at the time they plan to complete their certification programs. It is essential that students regularly review their Planned Program with their advisor so that changes in regulations can be incorporated into the Planned Program.

• All post-baccalaureate certification students, regardless of program, must have the following general education courses:
PSY 236 or a developmental or life span psychology course
HIST 261 or HIST 262 or a survey of American history course.
Coursework in four of the following areas: sciences, mathematics, English, fine arts, foreign language
These are requirements of the State of Connecticut and cannot be waived by advisors or the University. A course in developmental or life span psychology is a prerequisite for courses in the Professional Program.

• A Planned Program is developed for each student as part of the School of Graduate Studies admissions process. The Planned Program for all teacher education candidates, except for those in Special Education, must include the following Professional Program courses: SPED 315 (or 501), EDF 400 or 415, EDTE 315 or 316, methods courses, student teaching, a course in educational technology, and other courses as required by the student’s specific program. These courses are restricted to students admitted to the Professional Program. Special Education programs have different requirements listed under the special education department.

• Once the Planned Program has been prepared, students should meet with their designated advisor to develop a sequence and schedule plan to complete the program in a timely manner.

• Note: Most 400-level courses and all 300-level and below courses that apply to post-baccalaureate teacher certification programs are found in the Undergraduate Catalog.

Professional Program for Teacher Certification Policies
All policies of the Professional Program for Teacher Certification apply to all students admitted to the professional program, regardless of the program level of the student. A more complete description of polices can be found in the Undergraduate Catalog

Appeal for Admission GPA Waiver. Students who are denied admission because of a cumulative undergraduate GPA below 2.70 may appeal for a waiver of the GPA requirement. A limited number of GPA waivers are granted. Students denied a GPA waiver may consult with the department chair or their advisors for advice on how best to raise their GPA.

Restricted Professional Course Work. Most education courses offered in the teacher education programs require admission to the Professional Program for Teacher Certification. Students who have not been admitted to a teacher education program are not allowed to enroll in restricted courses.

Retention Criteria. Once admitted to a particular teacher education program, a post-baccalaureate student is expected to maintain:
• a 3.00 GPA overall and in the Professional Program,
• appropriate or professional behavior, attitudes, attributes, and responses in various contexts in which teachers and teacher candidates serve,
• acceptable performance during field experiences or Student Teaching,
• acceptable performance on performance assessments,
• adherence to the Connecticut Code of Professional Responsibility for Teachers,
• confidentiality of all information concerning colleagues and students obtained during the educational process, and
• integrity and honesty in written and verbal communications, documentation, and coursework at all times.

Connecticut Certification Procedures
The Connecticut State Board of Education is responsible for issuing teaching certificates required to teach in Connecticut public schools. Certification regulations are subject to change and the Connecticut State Board of Education requires students to meet the certification regulations in effect at the time they apply for certification.

The Assistant Dean of Education and Professional Studies is the CCSU Teacher Certification Officer. Questions concerning certification that cannot be answered by a department may be addressed to the Assistant Dean.

The instructions for down loading and completing the application for Connecticut certification can be found outside Barnard Hall 248. The completed forms are returned to the same office. While the Assistant Dean of the School of Education and Professional Studies recommends students completing CCSU programs for Connecticut certification, it is the State of Connecticut’s Bureau of Certification that makes the final determination about granting a certification.

Out-of-State Certification Procedures for CCSU Graduates

Most states have reciprocity agreements with the Connecticut State Department of Education to accept Connecticut teacher preparation programs in lieu of their own approved teacher preparation programs. Other requirements will need to be met for certification outside of Connecticut. Any state application that requires verification of completion of an Approved Program should be referred to the Assistant Dean of the School of Education and Professional Studies. The Assistant Dean will complete the forms and return them.


Counseling and Family Therapy

Faculty
Connie Tait (Chair, Barnard 230), Ralph Cohen, H. Jane Fried, Judith Rosenberg, Daniel Wiener (Department Secretary, Sarah Atkinson; phone: 832-2154)

Department Overview
The counseling and family therapy programs at Central Connecticut State University prepare students for professional careers in Marriage and Family Therapy, School Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling, Drug and Alcohol Recovery Counseling, Mental Health Counseling and Student Development in Higher Education. Courses are designed to develop student competence in the application of theory-based counseling models, to understand the concerns of diverse client populations and to enhance students’ personal and professional development. The practicum and clinical internship provide students with valuable opportunities to apply their skills in a field-based setting under close supervision. Students must obtain departmental approval prior to beginning their practicum.
Programs are accessible to full- and part-time students, offering flexible advising hours and classes in the late afternoons and evenings.

Programs

SCHOOL COUNSELING
48–51 credits

Graduates are prepared for positions as counselors in public and private schools. The program is designed to meet the certification requirements of the State of Connecticut and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs.

Core Courses (12 credits):
CNSL 500 The Dynamics of Group Behavior 3
CNSL 501 Theories and Techniques in Counseling 6
CNSL 503 Supervised Counseling Practicum 3

Specialized Courses (33 credits):
CNSL 504 Professional Studies in Counseling 3
CNSL 506 Counseling Children and Adolescents 3
CNSL 520 Guidance Principles, Organization and Administration 3
CNSL 521 Career Counseling and Development 3
CNSL 522 Appraisal Procedures in Counseling 3
CNSL 524 Consulting in the Schools 3
CNSL 525 Multicultural Counseling 3
CNSL 526 Principles of Comprehensive School Counseling 3
CNSL 591 Supervised School Guidance Internship (three credits for two semesters) 6
MFT 541 Introduction to Theories of Family Systems 3

Research (3 credits)
ED 598 Research in Education 3

Capstone (0–3 credits):
Plan A: CNSL 599 Thesis 3
or
Plan B: Comprehensive Exam (consists of a major case presentation done in conjunction with the student’s internship experience)

PROFESSIONAL AND
REHABILITATION COUNSELING
48–57 credits

The Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling programs prepare students to pursue employment in a variety of rehabilitation and mental health agencies. Students may decide to specialize in either Rehabilitation Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling with a drug and alcohol recovery focus, or Mental Health Counseling. The Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling programs provide the foundational coursework necessary for individuals interested in meeting State of Connecticut Department of Public Health requirements for becoming Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC) and/or national certification as Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC). The curriculum is also approved by the Connecticut Certification Board for students pursuing credentials as a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselors (LADC). There are additional post-master’s training requirements for both LPC and LADC candidates. The Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling program is a candidate for accreditation by the Commission on Rehabilitation Education (CORE).

Core (42 credits):
CNSL 500 The Dynamics of Group Behavior 3
CNSL 501 Theories and Techniques in Counseling 6
CNSL 503 Supervised Counseling Practicum 3
CNSL 504 Professional Studies in Counseling 3
CNSL 507 Methods in Group Facilitation 3
CNSL 521 Career Counseling and Development 3
CNSL 522 Appraisal Procedures in Counseling 3
CNSL 560 Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling 3
CNSL 561 Advanced Rehabilitation Counseling 3
CNSL 563 Medical Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling 3
CNSL 568 Alcohol and Drug Counseling 3
CNSL 571 Mental Health Counseling 3
PSY 598 Research in Psychology 3

Specialization Courses (6 credits):
Students in the Mental Health Counseling track are required to take two additional specialization courses as follows:
MFT 541 Introduction to Theories of Family Systems 3
PSY 530 Psychopathology
or
MFT 556 Systemic Perspectives on Mental Disorders 3

Internship (6 credits):
CNSL 594 Supervised Clinical Practice — Professional Counseling (two semesters) 6

Capstone (0–3 credits):
Plan A: CNSL 599 Thesis 3
or
Plan B: Comprehensive Exam (consists of a major case presentation done in conjunction with the student’s internship experience)

Note: It is expected that prior to beginning the supervised counseling practicum (CNSL 503) all Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling students will complete PSY 512. Students in the drug and alcohol recovery program must also complete PSY 454 prior to beginning practicum.

STUDENT DEVELOPMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION
42–45 credits


Graduates are prepared to function as student affairs professionals who work in student activities, residence halls, academic advising, career counseling, orientation, first-year experience courses, and learning centers in colleges and universities.

Core Courses (12 credits):
CNSL 500 The Dynamics of Group Behavior 3
CNSL 501 Theories and Techniques in Counseling 6
CNSL 503 Supervised Counseling Practicum 3

Directed Electives (30 credits):
CNSL 521 Career Counseling and Development 3
CNSL 525 Multicultural Counseling 3
CNSL 530 Student Development in Higher Education 3
CNSL 531 Student Services in Higher Education 3
CNSL 532 Program Design in Student Services 3
CNSL 533 Legal, Financial, and Policy Issues in Student Affairs 3
CNSL 592 Supervised Internship in Higher Education (two semesters) 6
ED 598* Research in Education 3
Additional course as approved by advisor 3

Capstone (0–3 credits):
Plan A: CNSL 599 Thesis 3
or
Plan B: Comprehensive Exam (consists of a major case presentation done in conjunction with the student’s internship experience)

* ED 598 may be waived by advisor based on undergraduate record of statistics and research.

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY
51 credits


The Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program leads to a Master’s of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy (M.S.M.F.T). The MFT program is designed to provide students with a solid theoretical background as a foundation for intensive clinical training in systemic approaches to human problems. The curriculum is designed to meet the academic requirements for Connecticut Licensure for Marital and Family Therapists and AAMFT Clinical Membership.
 
Clinical placements and intensive faculty supervision emphasize the development of effective therapeutic skills to meet the challenges of the new climate in health care service delivery. Emphasis is also placed on the development of the “person of the therapist.” A key theme of the program is respect for diversity of people and lifestyles in families. The program has been awarded accreditation by AAMFT’s Commission on Accreditation for MFT Education.

The practicum is a two-semester, 12-hour-per-week supervised clinical placement during the Second Year. Students learn basic clinical skills and begin working with clients. Students process their experiences in a small group format with a faculty supervisor.

The internship is a 12-month (three semester), 25-hour-per-week intensive clinical placement following the practicum experience which allows students to conduct marital and family therapy under supervision of an AAMFT Approved Supervisor. Interns conduct 500 hours of therapy with individuals, couples and families; 250 hours must be with couples and families. Interns receive a minimum of 100 hours of individual and group supervision with a minimum of 50 hours of supervision using actual clinical material (i.e., audio and videotapes) for intensive review.

On completion of 300 of the 500 clinical hours required for graduation, all students must complete a capstone project consisting of a comprehensive written examination of a clinical case seen by the student as well as an oral presentation of the case to MFT faculty and peers. This project is designed to help the student integrate his/her learning experiences in the program. In addition, students also may elect to complete Plan A (thesis).

Prerequisites (12 credits):
PSY 512 Seminar in Developmental Psychology 3
CNSL 500 The Dynamics of Group Behavior 3
CNSL 501 Theories and Techniques in Counseling 6

Marriage and Family Therapy specialization (51 credits) — thesis optional:
CNSL 504 Professional Studies in Counseling 3
MFT 541* Introduction to Theories of Family Systems 3
MFT 543 The Family Life Cycle 3
MFT 544 Families in Context: Gender and Cultural Dimensions 3
MFT 551 Structural/Strategic & Behavioral Family Therapies 3
MFT 552 Experiential, Intergenerational and Psychodynamic Family Therapies 3
MFT 554 Couples therapy 3
MFT 555 Dysfunctional Family Processes 3
MFT 556 Systemic Perspectives on Mental Disorders 3
MFT 557 Action Methods in Marital and Family Therapy 3
MFT 583 Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum I 3
MFT 584 Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum II 3
MFT 585 Marriage and Family Therapy Internship (3 credits in each of 3 consecutive semesters) 9
PSY  598 Research in Psychology 3
Elective required 3

* included as a pre-candidacy prerequisite

Admission Requirements
Admission requirements differ for the various programs within the Department of Counseling and Family Therapy. The following information describes the different program requirements.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL COUNSELING, PROFESSIONAL AND REHABILITATION COUNSELING, AND STUDENT DEVELOPMENT IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Admissions to the School Counseling, Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling, and Student Development in Higher Education programs are made on a competitive basis only one time per year. All applications must be completed and received by May 1 for fall admission of the following academic year. Candidates for admission will be selected on the basis of the following criteria:

1. Grade point average: Minimum 2.70 grade point average (GPA) for all undergraduate courses and a 3.00 for all graduate courses, based on a 4.00 point scale where A is 4.00

2. Three recommendations from individuals able to testify to the student’s
suitability as a prospective counselor.

3. A 2–3 page typewritten (double spaced) essay describing the following:
a. Reasons for entering the counseling profession.
b. Personal and professional experiences that influenced you to pursue the counseling profession.
c. Personal characteristics you believe will contribute to your success as a counselor.
4. A personal interview by the program’s faculty admissions committee. The committee will assess the student’s personal attributes and life experiences that might contribute to the student’s potential for success as a professional counselor.

ADDITIONAL ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOL COUNSELING
1. Documentation that the applicant has successfully passed all three parts of the Praxis I PPST Test or qualifies for a waiver. More information about the PRAXIS I PPST tests may be obtained by calling 1-800-742-9476 or by accessing the PRAXIS website at www.teachingandlearning.org . Applications for the PRAXIS I PSST tests and information about the waiver are usually available outside of the Office of the Dean, School of Education and Professional Studies, in Henry Barnard Hall.

2. At least one of the following prerequisite courses with a grade of B or better.
• A graduate course in psychology of human development that covers the whole life span (at CCSU PSY 512 meets this requirement)
• A course in education of exceptional learners including material relating to the special educational needs of students with physical and mental disabilities, the learning disabled, and the gifted and talented (at CCSU SPED 315 or SPED 501 meets this requirement)
• A course in contemporary education issues (at CCSU EDF 415, 500, 510, 516, 524, 525, 538, or 583 meets this requirement). Students who believe that they may have taken equivalent courses at the undergraduate level may submit copies of the course descriptions from the college catalog that was in print at the time they took the course.

Note: While only one prerequisite course is needed to qualify for admission, all three prerequisite courses must be completed prior to graduation.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY PROGRAM
The decision to admit the student into pre-candidacy status for the MFT program is based strictly on the student’s grade point average. The admission standard for this program requires a minimum of 2.70 grade point average (GPA) based on a 4.00 point scale where A is 4.00. Students with a grade point average between 2.40 and 2.69 may appeal their denial for admission and request a conditional admission. The conditional admission program is a non-degree arrangement that allows students to demonstrate the ability to perform successfully in a graduate degree program. It is afforded on a space-available basis to students who are able to demonstrate their potential through additional coursework, relevant life experiences, and/or recommendations from individuals qualified to testify to the student’s suitability to be a prospective counselor. All students who are accepted into the department are granted pre-candidacy status and are assigned an academic advisor. The advisor will orient the student regarding prerequisites, course scheduling, potential course transfers and substitutions, and the planned program of study.

All students are accepted into the Department of Counseling & Family Therapy as pre-candidates. Pre-candidacy status allows the student to begin taking classes. During the advising process, students will be informed of the specific steps they will need to take to apply for full candidacy into their program.

Field Experience
The supervised practicum and internship are considered to be the most critical experience elements in the program. Students must submit their applications for the practicum or internship to the department secretary before March 15 for the fall and summer semesters and before October 15 for the spring semester. Students must maintain a grade of B or better in every fieldwork course in order to continue in the program.

Other Programs

POST-MASTER’S STUDY
Candidates who complete the master’s degree in counseling may be able to continue their education at Central Connecticut State University by applying for admissions to a post-master’s plan program in a Counseling specialty. Once accepted the student and advisor will develop a planned program of study that must consist of a minimum of 30 credits that are completed within a six-year time period.

ADVANCED OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN PROFESSIONAL COUNSELING
Admission criteria: Master’s degree in counseling.
The Advanced Official Certificate Program in Professional Counseling is designed for practicing counselors who already hold a master’s degree in counseling and are preparing for state licensure as a Professional Counselor through the State of Connecticut Department of Public Health. A certificate in advanced graduate work in Professional Counseling is issued upon completion of a combination of any 12 credits of selected 500-level courses, with a grade of B or better, designated for the certificate program.


EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

Faculty
Anthony Rigazio-DiGilio (Chair, Barnard 260), Farough Abed, Karen Beyard (Ed.D. Director, Barnard 329), Carol J. Carter-Lowery, Judith Farynairz, Penelope Lisi, Tami Schultz, Bethany Silver, Olusegun Sogunro, Barry Sponder, Aldrige A. Vaillant, Sheldon Watson (Dept. phone: 832-2130)

Departmental Overview
The Department of Educational Leadership seeks to prepare well-educated and competent practitioners who are capable of improving the quality of education for Connecticut’s children. The Department values interdisciplinary collaboration in fulfilling its goal; as such, faculty associated with the Center for Multicultural Research and Education, Educational Technology, and Educational Leadership work together to design programs which will prepare professional educators with the skills and dispositions needed to create learning environments where all learners will be successful. The Department of Educational Leadership offers a Master of Science in Educational Technology, a Master of Science in Educational Leadership, a Sixth-Year Certificate leading to certification as an intermediate administrator or supervisor, a superintendent certificate program, and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership (Ed.D.). Non-degree programs leading only to certification are not available in this department.

Programs
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

With the assistance of their advisor, students will select one of two stands: Educational Leadership or Curriculum Leadership. All students will select either Plan A (thesis) or Plan B (comprehensive examination).
The admission standard for the Educational Leadership M.S. program includes either a 3.00 undergraduate GPA or a 2.70 GPA with a 3.00 upper-level GPA.

Strand I — Educational Leadership
(30 credits):
Graduates are prepared to assume leadership positions within public and private schools at the level of teacher.

Strand II — Curriculum Leadership
(30 credits): Graduates are prepared to provide specific leadership skills to public and private schools in the area of curriculum renewal.

Core Requirements (18 credits):
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues (or EDF 516, 524, 525, 538, 583)
ED 511 Principles of Curriculum Development
EDL 513 Supervision
ED 517 Evaluation
ED 540 Educational Motivation and the Learning Process
ED 598 Research in Education

Strand Requirements and Electives
(12 credits)

Strand I — Educational Leadership
Required courses (6 credits):
EDL 514 Administration
EDL 555 Leadership for Culturally Diverse Schools

Elective courses (6 credits):
Students select advisor-approved elective courses to complete their graduate program

Strand II — Curriculum Leadership
Required courses (6 credits):
EDL 551 Curriculum Leadership
EDL 555 Leadership for Culturally Diverse Schools

Elective courses (6 credits):
Students select advisor-approved elective courses to complete their graduate program

Note: While students may take some courses as non-matriculated students, they must be accepted into the program before taking a fourth 500-level course. 500-level courses beyond the third course will not count toward program completion.

SIXTH-YEAR CERTIFICATE IN
EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

The Sixth-Year Certificate program meets the needs of educators who seek to acquire (1) advanced career and professional development, and (2) the leadership skills and credentials necessary to function effectively in school settings under the Intermediate Administrator/Supervisor Certificate. Graduates of the program who pass the Connecticut Administrator Test and go on to be certified as intermediate administrators or supervisors will be eligible for such positions as elementary or secondary principal/assistant principal, program coordinator, department head, and assistant superintendent, or for positions on the staffs of central offices, regional educational agencies, and the State Department of Education.

Admissions Requirements
Admissions to this program is limited and highly competitive. The department accepts applications for summer and fall semesters only. All application and supporting materials for admission to the program must be received by May 1 for students taking EDL 590 in the summer and December 1 for students taking EDL 590 in the spring. In addition to meeting the general requirements, admission to the Sixth-Year Certificate program will be based on the completion of EDL 590 and submission of an application portfolio evaluated on the following criteria:

• Possess a master’s degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education
• Attained a 3.30 minimum post-baccalaureate cumulative grade-point average (GPA) on a four-point scale or its equivalent
• Have a minimum of three years of teaching experience and possess, or be eligible for, a Connecticut teaching certificate (Students who do not hold an educator’s certificate issued by the Connecticut State Department of Education must also pass Praxis I)
• Two letters of reference from school administrators
• A formal essay which focuses on (1) the reasons that led the candidate to the area of school leadership, and (2) future career goals
• Materials required from the EDL 590 course
• Successful presentation of the application portfolio to a team of faculty members.

EDL 590 will be offered only twice a year and students may enroll with permission of the chair. All applicants must take this course in either the spring or summer semester. Application portfolio presentations will be scheduled at the end of the EDL 590 course.

Program of Study
The Sixth-Year Certificate in Educational Leadership, including recommendation for certification for the Intermediate Administrator/Supervisor, requires a minimum of 30 credits. Requirements include completion of EDL 590, 22 credits of professional core and 5–8 credits of advisor-approved electives.

Pre-admission Course Requirement (3 credits):
EDL 590 Leaders as Learners: Educational Leadership and Self-Assessment

Professional Core (22 credits):
EDL 605 Leadership in Teaching and Learning I 3
EDL 606 Leadership in Teaching and Learning II 3
EDL 610 School Leadership I 3
EDL 611 School Leadership II 3
EDL 615 Understanding External Environments of School Leadership I 3
EDL 616 Understanding External Environments of School Leadership II 3
EDL 690 Internship in Educational Leadership I: Theory and Practice 2
EDL 691 Internship in Educational Leadership II: Research and Practice 2

Electives (5–8 credits of advisor-approved electives)

Note: To receive certification, students must also pass a performance-based examination administered by the State of Connecticut. The State of Connecticut also requires 50 months of teaching experience prior to licensure and completion of a designated course in special education, which may be used as part of the elective requirements.

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP
The doctorate in education (Ed.D.) has been designed for delivery to a cohort of full-time educational professionals on weekends, evenings, and during the summer. The program has many innovative features and serves teachers and administrators in PreK–12 education who want to prepare for a variety of leadership positions: principals, lead teachers, department heads, curriculum and assessment specialists, assistant superintendents, and superintendents. The Ed.D. is based on the premise that learning takes place through an integration of course work and experiences that stem from a clear conception of leadership, the knowledge base of the field, and a structure that allows doctoral students and faculty to collaborate on shared work improving education in the State of Connecticut.

Admissions
Admission to the program is available in alternate years for a cohort of 25 students. Deadline for admission is December 1. To be considered for admission to the Ed.D. in Educational Leadership, applicants must have earned a master’s degree in an appropriate discipline or professional field and have professional goals that are consistent with the goals and beliefs of the program. Admission to the program is open to all qualified applicants without regard to age, race, sex, religion, physical disability, or national origin.

Admission Criteria
The follow minimum criteria have been established for admission into the Ed.D. Program:
1. Master’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education in a discipline or professional field that is relevant to the Ed.D. Program
2. 3.00 GPA on all graduate coursework
3. Two positive letters of reference from leaders in education familiar with the applicant’s work
4. Detailed résumé that illustrates important work-related experiences
5. Acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination (within five years of admission and including a writing assessment)
6. An acceptable personal statement covering three important topics:
• Career goals
• Reasons for pursuing a doctorate
• Ability and commitment to devote four weeks to summer study for the first two summers of the program and some additional on-campus summer study during the third or fourth summers
7. If selected as a finalist, a satisfactory interview with the admission committee

Admission Process
The application packet for the Ed.D. can be obtained from the Graduate Admissions Office, the Office of the School of Graduate Studies, or from the Graduate Studies and Ed.D. Program websites. Admission decisions are determined by a faculty admissions committee.

Program of Study
The program is divided into four major components: (1) a required core in educational leadership; (2) a specialty area; (3) a series of inquiry-oriented seminars; and (4) the dissertation component. These components and the credits required in each component are summarized below.

Component I:
Core in Educational Leadership (18 credits)

Component II:
Specialty area in one of the following (15 credits):
• Administrative Leadership
• Curriculum and Literacy

Component III:
Inquiry Seminars (16 credits)

Component IV:
Capstone: Dissertation and Dissemination (14 credits)

Total: minimum 63 credits

Component I establishes the foundational core of the program with particular emphasis in education leadership and teaching and learning. Four core courses are required of all candidates. Courses include: EDF 700; EDL 701, 702, 705; and EDT 700. All courses in the core are open only to Ed.D. students. Nine credits of the core courses are taken during the initial summer of study and another nine credits are completed during the second summer.
Component II includes a specialty area of the student’s choice. Two specializations are available:
• Administrative Leadership. This specialization is for students who aspire for administrative positions in public schools. It could lead to certification for intermediate administrator (a State of Connecticut certificate) and the superintendency, but certification is not the emphasis of this specialization.
• Curriculum and Literacy. This specialization is for students who plan leadership careers in PK–12 settings such as reading and curriculum specialists. It includes courses in literacy, curriculum, and instructional leadership.

Component III of the program includes research courses, field-based inquiry projects, and a series of seminars designed to help students understand the processes of inquiry. Component III leads into and facilitates Component IV, the completion of the dissertation and dissemination of the results of the students’ study to appropriate audiences. Special course work in research and ongoing inquiry projects will culminate with the completion of the student’s dissertation. More information about all of these components is available on the program’s website.

Candidate Assessment
The curriculum of the Ed.D. Program has been designed to align with national and state standards for doctoral studies in the field of educational leadership and with the program’s conceptual framework. Prior to being granted the Ed.D. degree, each candidate completes a dissertation and demonstrates proficiency on each program standard. Criteria for judging performance on other standards are described in the Assessment and Dissertation Handbook.

During the second year of the program, each Ed.D. candidate completes a summative electronic portfolio. This portfolio consists of evidence (artifacts, evaluations, projects, and reflections) gathered from the beginning of the program. All entries must be tied to the program’s conceptual framework and to the program’s advanced leadership standards. Candidates present their portfolios to a committee of faculty, including their dissertation advisors.

Foundational Core (18 credits):
EDF 700 The Purposes of Education in America 3
EDL 705 Leadership to Promote Effective Teaching and Learning 6
EDT 700 Topics in Leadership for Technology in Schools 3
EDL 701 Leading Organizational Change I: Theory 3
EDL 702 Leading Organizational Change II: Program 3

Inquiry Seminars and Dissertation (30 credits required; up to six additional credits optional):
EDL 710 Inquiry Seminar I: The Study of Human and Organizational Learning 2
EDL 711 Inquiry Seminar II: Quantitative and Qualitative Research I 3
EDL 712 Inquiry Seminar III: Quantitative and Qualitative Research II 3
EDL 713 Inquiry Seminar IV: Study of Organizational Change 2
EDL 714 Inquiry Seminar V: Advanced Research Design 3
EDL 715 Inquiry Seminar VI: The Dissertation Proposal 3
EDL 716 Inquiry Seminar VII: Dissertation I 2
EDL 717 Inquiry Seminar VIII: Dissertation II 5
EDL 718 Inquiry Seminar IX: Dissertation III 5
EDL 719 Inquiry Seminar X: Dissertation IV (may be repeated for up to 6 credits over three calendar years) 1
EDL 720 Inquiry Seminar XI: Disseminating Research Findings 2

Specialty Study (15 credits of electives in Administrative Leadership or Curriculum and Literacy):

Administrative Leadership
EDL 610 School Leadership I 3
EDL 611 School Leadership II 3
EDL 615 Understanding External Environments of School Leadership I 3
EDL 616 Understanding External Environments of School Leadership II 3
MGT 553 Human Resource Management 3
MGT 583 Organizational Leadership 3
EDL 634 Seminar in Curriculum Development 3
EDL 652 Advanced Topics in Educational Leadership 1–6
EDL 680 Educational Planning 3
EDL 681 The Superintendency I: Leading District Operations 3
EDL 682 The Superintendency II: Board and Public Relations 3
EDL 695 Internship: The Superintendency I 3
EDL 696 Internship: The Superintendency II 3
EDL 697 Readings and Conference 1–6 (repeated for up to 6 credits)
EDL 690 Internship in Educational Leadership I: Theory and Practice 2
EDL 691 Internship in Educational Leadership II: Research and Practice 2

Curriculum and Literacy
RDG 667 Multicultural Literature in the Classroom 3
RDG 675 Reading and Writing as Integrated Process 3
RDG 680 Current Trends and Issues in Reading and Language Arts 3
RDG 686 Literacy Instruction for Diverse Populations II 3
RDG 698 Research Seminar 3
RDG 700 Seminar in Literacy 3
EDL 634 Seminar in Curriculum Development 3
EDL 652 Advanced Topics in Educational Leadership 1–6
EDL 697 Readings and Conference (repeated for up to 6 credits) 1–6

ADVANCED OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
Total credits: 12–15

The program is designed for educational professionals seeking certification as a School District Superintendent. The core program consists of two courses on theory and research (EDL 681 and EDL 682) and two courses on practice (EDL 695 and EDL 696). Candidates who have completed their graduate work at CCSU will be required to take 12 credits. Candidates who have completed their graduate work at another institution will be required to complete 15 semester hours as mandated by State Department of Education. Courses to be approved by advisor are dependent on student’s prior coursework.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY

The Master of Science in Educational Technology offers study plans to meet the needs of professionals who wish to increase their knowledge and experience in this field. Computer-based instruction, instructional design, interactive multimedia, networking and distance learning are examined within the program’s requirements. Students pursue an applied curriculum which includes a balanced approach to theory and applied experience. Plan A (thesis) or Plan E (special project) may be selected in consultation with the advisor.

Core Courses (27 credits):
EDT 500 Instructional Design and Evaluation I
EDT 501 Message Design and Production
EDT 510 Design Tools
EDT 512 Computer-based Instruction
EDT 521 Interactive Multimedia for Instruction I
EDT 522 Instructional Design and Evaluation II
EDT 531 Interactive Multimedia for Instruction II
EDT 532 Distance Learning and Networking I
EDT 533 Distance Learning and Networking II

Professional Education (3 credits):
One of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues
EDF 516 School and Society
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum
EDF 525 History of American Education
EDF 538 The Politics of Education
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education
or
EDT 514 Integrating Technology in the Classroom Curriculum

Research and Capstone Requirements (6 credits):
Plan E: EDT 598 and EDT 597, Final Project

Computer prerequisite: A valid CCSU BlueNetID (username) and password. Graduate students must also have a personal computer and e-mail account.

Special Service Course (undergraduate and graduate):
EDT 490 Instructional Computing

Note: Students interested in a School Library Media Specialist cross-endorsement should contact the Connecticut State Department of Education Certification Office.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Faculty
David Harackiewicz (Chair, Kaiser 0180), Jan Bishop, Antone Capitao, Matthew Cummiskey, Catherine Fellows, Frank Frangione, Thomas McCarthy, Peter Morano, Victoria Morley, Elizabeth O’Neill, Katherine Pirog, Susan Smith, Kimberly Tower, Sean Walsh (Dept. phone: 832-2155)

Department Overview
The Department of Physical Education and Human Performance offers courses leading to a Master of Science Degree in Physical Education for certified teachers and professionals in the allied fields of exercise science and sports medicine. Also available is undergraduate course work leading to Connecticut teacher certification in physical education.

Programs

The graduate program of Physical Education is designed to: (1) increase the competency of teachers of physical education and (2) provide valuable subject matter for professionals in exercise science and sports medicine.
An undergraduate program in physical education from an accredited institution of higher education is preferred for admission to the master’s degree program. This undergraduate program should be the equivalent of the undergraduate program at CCSU.

Note: No more than 9 credits at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.

Note: The following courses will have the new designator EXS after Fall 2007: PE 507, 515, 519, 522, 523, 530, 590, 592.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
30 credits

Admissions requirements: Admission to the School of Graduate Studies

Electives:
3–6 credits of courses other than Education or Physical Education as approved by faculty advisor

Professional Education:
3–6 credits of Education courses other than Physical Education, as approved by faculty advisor, from: EDF 500, 516, 524, 525, 538, or 583.

Specialization:
15–18 credits of department offerings as approved by faculty advisor.
PE 402 Organization and Administration of Physical Education
PE 405 Elementary Methods in Physical Education
PE 410 Exercise Physiology
PE 411 Organization and Management of Health Promotion Programs
PE 415 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription
PE 425 Implementation and Evaluation of Health Promotion Programs
PE 450 Practicum in Exercise Science
PE 470 Internship in Exercise and Health Promotion
PE 500 Improving Student Learning in Physical Education
PE 505 Instructional Tools for Physical Education
PE 507 Human Perspective in Sport
PE 510 Instructional Models for Physical Education
PE 515 Sport, Physical Activity, and Exercise Psychology
PE 519 Sport Biomechanics
PE 520 Current Issues in Physical Education
PE 522 Physical Activity and Health
PE 523 Theories of High-Level Performance in Sport
PE 524 Sport, Physical Education, Athletics, and the Law
PE 525 The Regulation of Intercollegiate and Interscholastic Athletics
PE 530 Nutrition for Health, Fitness, and Sport Performance
PE 590 Independent Study/Topics in Physical Education and Sports Medicine
PE 592 Advanced Physiology of Sport and Exercise

Research (3–6 credits):
PE 598 Research in Physical Education and Human Performance (required for all plans)
PE 599 Thesis (required for Plan A only)

Capstone Requirement:
Plan A (Thesis) or Plan B (Comprehensive Exam)

POST-BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM FOR CERTIFICATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may pursue teacher certification in Physical Education through our post-baccalaureate program. This program prepares students for PK–12 teacher certification and does not result in a master’s degree. For information on admission to this program, see page 53.

POST-MASTER’S STUDY
A 30-credit planned program of post-master’s study is available for the professional physical educator who wishes to expand or update knowledge of physical education and the related fields of exercise science and health fitness.


READING AND
LANGUAGE ARTS


Faculty
Helen R. Abadiano (Chair, Barnard 245), Elene Demos, Julia Kara-Soteriou, Catherine Kurkjian, Cara M. Mulcahy, Jesse Turner, Lynda Valerie, Kenneth J. Weiss (Dept. phone: 832-2175; Dept. website: www.reading.ccsu.edu))

Department Overview
The Department of Reading and Language Arts is committed to promoting and enhancing quality instruction in reading and language arts. Preparing literacy leaders for service in our communities is the overarching mission of the department and is consistent with and closely aligned to the theme of preparing leaders for service in our communities embraced by the School of Education and Professional Studies. The underlying principles of our mission are derived from our professional standards as defined by the International Reading Association and NCTE and by state mandates. Accordingly, the department offers a Master of Science degree program and a Sixth-Year Certificate in Reading and Language Arts. The Master of Science degree offers strands in Classroom Instruction in Reading and Language Arts, and Corrective and Remedial Reading and Language Arts. The master’s program also offers a strand in Reading-Mathematics. The Sixth-Year Certificate program may include courses leading to a reading consultant certification by the State of Connecticut. An Advanced Official Certificate Program in Reading and Language Arts is also available for students who have completed a Master of Science degree in Reading and Language Arts. All programs require practicum, clinical, or field-based experiences under close supervision in order to provide students with opportunities to apply their skills. The Department of Reading and Language Arts collaborates with the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership program in offering a specialty area in literacy leading to consultant certification. It is also home to the Central Connecticut Writing Project under the National Writing Project.

Admission
To apply to the Department of Reading and Language Arts Master of Science degree or Sixth-Year Certificate program, a student must submit an application for graduate admission, official copies of transcripts, and application fee directly to the School of Graduate Studies. Other admission requirements for the Master of Science degree program in Reading and Language Arts are explained in the admissions packet distributed by the School of Graduate Studies at the time of application. Admission packets may also be downloaded from the department website at www.reading.ccsu.edu/Programs/APPLICAT.HTM . Admission requirements include (1) letters of recommendation, (2) application essay, (3) department interview, (4) teaching certification and experience qualifications, and (5) basic computer literacy. A Connecticut teaching certification and a special education course are required for students seeking endorsement as remedial reading and language arts teachers or reading and language arts consultants.
Students seeking endorsement as a Reading and Language Arts Consultant in the State of Connecticut must apply to the School of Graduate Studies and the Department of Reading and Language Arts for admission to the Advanced Official Certificate Program. In addition to the general requirements for admission to the Reading and Language Arts program, the candidate must have completed a Master of Science degree in Reading and Language Arts.

Program Requirements

Electronic Program Portfolio: An Electronic Program Portfolio (EPP) is required of all Master of Science degree and Sixth-Year Certificate students graduating from the Department of Reading and Language Arts. The student and the program advisor develop the e-portfolio during the course work phase of the student’s program. The e-portfolio will be a reflection of student competencies from areas recommended by the Connecticut State Department of Education and the International Reading Association. Evidence of membership to a state/regional, national and/or international professional organization in Reading and Language Arts, as well as attendance or participation in state/regional and/or national/international conferences for each year a student is enrolled in the program must be included in the e-portfolio.

CCSU “NT” Account: A CCSU “NT” account is required for all courses in the graduate programs in Reading and Language Arts. An “NT” account may be obtained via the CCSU Computer Center.

Mid-Program Evaluation: Students in the Master of Science degree and Sixth-Year Certificate program in Reading and Language Arts must meet with their program advisor following completion of fifteen graduate credits for a mid-program evaluation. For the Master of Science degree candidates, a mid-program evaluation is required for the approval of an application for comprehensive examination or thesis writing. For the Sixth-Year Certificate program candidates, a mid-program evaluation is required for the practicum course. Students are expected to have their e-portfolio accessible for evaluation.

Planned Program of Graduate Study

Following admission to the Master of Science degree and Sixth-Year Certificate program in Reading and Language Arts, students must meet with their assigned program advisor to complete a planned program of graduate study. Only courses approved in the planned program of study will be counted toward graduation.

Note: M.S. and Sixth-Year Certificate students may transfer up to six credits of courses, including on-line courses, from accredited institutions upon recommendation of the program advisor and approval of the department chair. No transfer credits will be allowed after a student’s planned program of study has been approved.

MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE PROGRAMS IN READING AND
LANGUAGE ARTS

The Master of Science degree in Reading and Language Arts is designed to increase knowledge and to improve skills of teachers in the area of reading and language arts. Additionally, the program includes three strands—Corrective and Remedial Reading and Language Arts, Classroom Instruction in Reading and Language Arts, and Reading-Mathematics. The student’s planned program of graduate study totals a minimum of 30–33 credits and must include the following: either Plan A: RDG 599 Thesis (6 credits) or RDG 599 (3 credits) and RDG 598 Seminar in Reading and Language Arts Research (3 credits) or Plan B: RDG 598 Seminar in Reading and Language Arts Research (3 credits) and Comprehensive exam, and include a field of study (27 credits).
A planned program of graduate study will be developed by the student and the program advisor. Based on the program advisor’s evaluation of student’s needs, background, and experiences in reading and language arts, a student may need to complete additional coursework for his/her planned program of graduate study and therefore may exceed the minimum of 30–33 credits.

Strand in Classroom Instruction in Reading and Language Arts
(non-certification track)

For the Strand in Classroom Instruction in Reading and Language Arts, a student’s planned program of graduate study totals 27 credits and includes courses from the following:
RDG 502 Current Trends in Developmental Reading K–12
or
RDG 503 Developmental Reading in Primary Grades
or
RDG 504 Middle School Level Literacy Development
or
RDG 505 Developmental Reading in the Secondary Schools
RDG 569 Folktelling Art and Technique
RDG 578 Teaching Writing in the Elementary Schools
RDG 579 Technology in Reading and Language Arts Instruction
RDG 582 Introduction to Critical Literacy
RDG 585 Reading in Content Area
RDG 586 Literacy Instruction for Diverse Populations I
RDG 587 Bibliotherapy
RDG 588 Teaching Children’s Literature
RDG 589 Creative Language Arts

Strand in Reading-Mathematics (non-certification track)
The strand in Reading-Mathematics totals 27 credits. The student’s planned program of graduate study includes 12–15 credits of reading and language arts courses from the following:
RDG 502 Current Trends in Developmental Reading K–12
or
RDG 503 Developmental Reading in the Primary Grades
or
RDG 504 Middle School Level Literacy Development
or
RDG 505 Developmental Reading in the Secondary Schools
RDG 578 Teaching Writing in the Elementary Schools
RDG 585 Reading in Content Area
RDG 588 Teaching Children’s Literature
RDG 589 Creative Language Arts
The remaining 12–15 credits are mathematics courses recommended by the department of mathematical sciences.

Strand in Corrective and Remedial Reading and Language Arts (certification track)
The Strand in Corrective and Remedial Reading and Language Arts totals 27 credits and requires the clinical sequence—RDG 594, 595, and 596, and the following courses: RDG 503 Developmental Reading in Primary Grades
or
RDG 504 Middle School Level Literacy Development
or
RDG 505 Developmental Reading in the Secondary Schools
RDG 578 Teaching Writing in the Elementary Schools
RDG 585 Reading in Content Area
RDG 588 Teaching Children’s Literature
RDG 589 Creative Language Arts

SIXTH-YEAR CERTIFICATE IN
READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS

The Sixth-Year Certificate in Reading and Language Arts program leads to the award of the professional certificate. This program may include course work required for endorsement as a Reading and Language Arts Consultant in the State of Connecticut. The certification-track program provides opportunities for the student to examine reading and language arts from a perspective beyond classroom teaching. The student’s planned program of graduate study is developed by the student and the program advisor.
Course requirements will be based on the student’s needs in terms of fulfilling professional and personal goals. Related areas of study may be developed in disciplines such as Elementary Education, Educational Leadership, Educational Technology, Mathematics, and Special Education. A minimum of 15 credits of 600-level courses is required in both the certification track and the non-certification track programs for the certificate.

Reading/Language Arts Consultant
Certification Track
The student’s planned program of study totals a minimum of 30 credits and must include the following:
RDG 696 Practicum for Reading and Language Arts Consultants
RDG 698 Research Seminar
RDG 588 Teaching Children’s Literature
RDG 692 Specialized Diagnosis & Remedial Techniques
RDG 694 Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Reading and Language Arts Programs

Required prerequisites:
RDG 594 Diagnosis of Reading and Language Arts Difficulties
RDG 595 Remedial and Corrective Techniques in Reading and Language Arts
RDG 596 Clinical Practices in Reading and Language Arts

A student may need to complete additional coursework for his/her planned program of study and therefore may exceed the minimum of 30 credits.

Reading/Language Arts Consultant
Non-Certification Track

Research (3 credits):
RDG 698 Research Seminar

Related Area of Study (6 credits)

Area of Specialization (15–18 credits)

Electives (3–6 credits)

ADVANCED OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE
PROGRAM IN READING AND
LANGUAGE ARTS

This is a non-degree program providing coursework to lead to endorsement as a Reading and Language Arts Consultant in the State of Connecticut. Students are expected to have a Master of Science degree in Reading and Language Arts and to take courses required by the State of Connecticut for Reading and Language Arts Consultant Certification, including prerequisite courses when necessary. The required courses are as follows, for a total of 15 to 27 credits of course work:

RDG 588 Teaching Children’s Literature
RDG 692 Specialized Diagnosis and Remedial Techniques
RDG 694 Organization, Administration, and Supervision of Reading and Language Arts Programs
RDG 696 Practicum for Reading and Language Arts Consultants

Required prerequisites:
RDG 594 Diagnosis of Reading and Language Arts Difficulties
RDG 595 Remedial and Corrective Techniques in Reading and Language Arts
RDG 596 Clinical Practices in Reading and Language Arts


SPECIAL EDUCATION

Faculty
Mitchell Beck (Chair, Barnard 232), John Foshay, Joan Nicoll-Senft, Ernest Pancsofar, Joanne Walker (Dept. phone: 832-2400)

Department Overview
The Department of Special Education offers a Master of Science degree with two specializations. One specialization is designed for students who already hold certification in special education. In this specialization, students take coursework designed to broaden and/or deepen their knowledge of the field.

The second specialization contains two strands and is designed for students who have certification in elementary education or a 7–12 secondary subject certificate in biology, business, chemistry, earth science, English, history/social sciences, integrated science, mathematics, or physics. Strand A leads to a master’s degree and does not provide coursework to lead to a cross endorsement in special education. Strand B both leads to a master’s degree and provides coursework that may lead to a cross endorsement for either elementary or secondary (including middle level) special education. Students in Strand B must have a current Connecticut certification.

Specializations
MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS ALREADY CERTIFIED IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
30 credits

General Education Elective (3 credits)

Professional Education (6 credits)
SPED 566 Legal and Administrative Issues in Special Education 3
and one of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues 3
EDF 516 School and Society 3
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum 3
EDF 525 History of American Education 3
EDF 538 The Politics of Education 3
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education 3

Specialization (12 credits):
Electives — Students usually take 12 credits of advanced-level course work in special education. Up to 6 credits of related course work from other departments may be included at the advisor’s discretion.

Research (9 credits):
SPED 596 Designing Action Research in Special Education (Plan E) 3
SPED 597 Implementing and Documenting Action Research in Special Education (Plan E) 3
ED 598 Research in Education 3

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM FOR STUDENTS WITH CERTIFICATION IN OTHER AREAS OF EDUCATION
Strand A:
Completion of Planned Program does not lead to cross endorsement in special education (30 credits)

Professional Education (6 credits):
SPED 566 Legal and Administrative Issues in Special Education 3
and one of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues 3
EDF 516 School and Society 3
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum 3
EDF 525 History of American Education 3
EDF 538 The Politics of Education 3
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education 3

Strand A (15 credits):
Choose 6 credits from:
SPED 511 Behavioral/Emotional Disorders 3
SPED 512 Learning Disabilities 3
SPED 513 Developmental Disabilities 3

Choose at least 9 credits from:
SPED 506 Foundations of Language for the Exceptional Child 3
SPED 510 Inclusive Education 3
SPED 536 Autism Spectrum Disorder 3
SPED 560 Positive Classroom Management for Students Receiving Special Education Services 3
SPED 578 The Juvenile Offender with Special Education Needs 3
SPED 580 Collaborative Process in Special Education 3
SPED 581 Assistive Technology in Special Education 3
SPED 595 Topics in Special Education 1–3

Note: Other courses offered in the Department of Special Education may be substituted as they become available; i.e., special topics.

Research (9 credits):
ED 598 Research in Education 3
SPED 596 Designing Action Research in Special Education (Plan E) 3
SPED 597 Implementing and Documenting Action Research in Special Education (Plan E) 3

Strand B: Completion of Planned Program leads to an endorsement in special education (36–39 credits)

Professional Education (3 credits):
One of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues 3
EDF 516 School and Society 3
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum 3
EDF 525 History of American Education 3
EDF 538 The Politics of Education 3
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education 3

Strand B (24 credits):
SPED 511 Behavioral/Emotional Disorders 3
SPED 512 Learning Disabilities 3
SPED 513 Developmental Disabilities 3
SPED 514 Cognitive Behavior Management and Social Skills Strategies 3
SPED 515 Assessment in Special Education 3
SPED 516 Instructional Programming for Students with Exceptionalities 3

SPED 517 Instructional Methods for Students with Special Needs—Elementary 3
or
SPED 518 Instructional Methods for Students with Special Needs—Secondary 3

and one of the following:
SPED 521 Student Teaching in Special Education—Elementary 3
SPED 522 Student Teaching in Special Education—Secondary 3
SPED 523 Practicum in Special Education—Elementary 3
SPED 524 Practicum in Special Education—Secondary 3

Research (9 credits):
ED 598 Research in Education 3
SPED 596 Designing Action Research in Special Education (Plan E) 3
SPED 597 Implementing and Documenting Action Research in Special Education (Plan E) 3

Strand C: Master of Science Program for Students Already Certified in Special Education (30 credits)

Professional Education (6 credits):
SPED 566 Legal and Administrative Issues in Special Education 3
and one of the following:
EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues 3
EDF 516 School and Society 3
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum 3
EDF 525 History of American Education 3
EDF 538 The Politics of Education 3
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education 3

Strand C (15 credits):
Electives: Students usually take 15 credits of advanced-level course work in special education. Up to 6 credits of related course work from other departments may be included at the advisor’s discretion.

Research (9 credits):
ED 598 Research in Education 3
SPED 596 Designing Action Research in Special Education (Plan E) 3
SPED 597 Implementing and Documenting Action Research in Special Education (Plan E) 3

TEACHER
EDUCATION


Faculty
Susan Seider (Chair, Barnard 277), Aram Ayalon (Assistant to the Chair), Elizabeth Aaronsohn, Ronnie Casella, Barbara Clark, Gail Cueto, Lynda George, Nancy Hoffman, Maxine Howell, Lawrence Klein, Marian Matthews, Daniel Mulcahy, Karen Riem (Dept. phone: 832-2415)

Department Overview
The Department of Teacher Education is committed to the initial preparation and continuing professional education of those involved in early childhood, elementary and secondary education. Accordingly, the department offers programs leading to a Master of Science degree in the following areas: Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations: Policy or Secondary Education, and Elementary Education. The department offers Post-Baccalaureate Teaching Certificate programs in elementary and secondary education that are both part-time and full-time, and a 30-credit planned program of post-master’s study in elementary education.
The department plans to offer a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT): Teacher Education with specializations in Mathematics, Science, Spanish, English, Technology Education, and Special Education upon completion of the approval processes for the Connecticut Department of Higher Education and the Board of Governors. Once approved, this program will be listed on the department website at www.ccsu.edu/grad and on the graduate application. Students interested in pursuing this degree should contact the Teacher Education Department.

Programs
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
33 credits


Contact: Susan Seider (832-2429)

This program is designed for early childhood educators wishing to pursue graduate study which extends their knowledge of the theory and practice of early childhood education. The program consists of a number of core requirements, directed electives, and the opportunity to develop research skills in the field.
The student’s planned program of graduate study must include the following:

Introductory Block 1 (9 credits):
EDTE 502 Focus on Diversity in Education
EDF 516 School and Society
ED 598 Research in Education

Curriculum and Instruction Block 2 (9 credits):
EDEC 551 Programs and Curricula in Early Childhood Education
EDEC 552 Programs and Curricula in Early Childhood Education II
EDEC 554 Observation and Assessment in Early Childhood Education

Specialization Block 3 (9 credits):
Choose from the following options:
a) Leadership/Directorship:
EDL 513 Supervision
EDEC 561 Administration in Early Childhood Education
EDEC 553 Family, School and Community Partnerships in Early Childhood Education

b) Working with Families:
EDEC 553 Family, School and Community Partnerships in Early Childhood Education
RDG 586 Literacy Instruction for Diverse Populations I
Related course approved in advance by advisor (SPED 510 recommended)

c) Urban Education:
EDF 510 The Social, Political, and Cultural Context of Urban Schools
EDEL 509 Education and the Development of Cultural Understanding
EDEL 485 Approaches to Discipline in Elementary School (K–8)

Capstone Block (6 credits):
EDEL 591 and EDEL 592 (all students will be Plan E). Capstone prerequisite is completion of all Block 1 courses and no less than 12 credits in Block 2 and 3.

Program Sequence: Students are encouraged to complete the Introductory Block 1 before taking courses in the Curriculum and Instruction and Specialization Blocks 2 and 3. Courses in the Curriculum and Instruction and Specialization Blocks may be taken concurrently with courses from the Introductory Block with permission of advisor.

Note: A maximum of 6 credits in 400-level may be taken with the approval of the graduate advisor.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS/POLICY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION STRANDS


Contact: Aram Ayalon (832-2135)

This program is designed to offer teachers and other educators the opportunity to pursue graduate studies in the foundations of education or a combination of foundations and secondary education. There are, accordingly, two strands from which a choice is made. Strand 1 is centered on the theme of policy studies in American education. Strand 2 employs an approach to the study of curriculum and instruction in secondary education which integrates both theory and practice. Teacher certification in a secondary or NK–12 area is required for admission to Strand 2.

Strand 1: Educational Foundations and Policy Studies
30 credits

Core courses (18 credits, no sequence specified; take any 6 of the following):

EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues
EDF 516 School and Society
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum
EDF 525 History of American Education
EDF 528 Comparative and International Education
EDF 535 Special Topics in Educational Foundations
EDF 538 The Politics of Education
EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education

Required course (3 credits):
ED 598 Research in Education

Capstone:
Plan A, Thesis (ED 599) plus two electives approved by advisor.
or
Plan B, Comprehensive exam (available fall or spring only), with electives (9 credits) approved by advisor.

Strand 2: Secondary Curriculum, Foundational and Instructional Issues
30 credits

Introductory Block 1 (9 credits):
EDTE 502 Focus on Diversity in Education
EDF 516 School and Society
ED 598 Research in Education

Curriculum and Instruction Block 2 (9 credits):
EDSC 505 Innovations in Secondary Education
EDSC 556 Instructional Theory and Practice
EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum

Specialization Block 3 (9 credits):
Choose from the following options:
a) Foundations: EDF 583, EDF 528, EDF 525, EDF 538, EDF 500
b) Subject areas: Choose 3 courses in the subject area in which certified or in literacy.

Capstone Block (3 credits):
EDSC 586 (all students are Plan E). Capstone prerequisite is completion of all Block 1 courses and at least 12 credits in Blocks 2 and 3.

Program Sequence: Students are encouraged to complete the Introductory Block 1 before taking courses in the Curriculum and Instruction and Specialization Blocks 2 and 3. Courses in the Curriculum and Instruction and Specialization Blocks may be taken concurrently with courses from the Introductory Block with permission of advisor.

Note: No more than 9 credits at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
33 credits


Contact: Susan Seider (832-2429)

This program is designed for elementary education teachers wishing to pursue graduate study which extends their knowledge of the theory and practice of elementary education. The program consists of a number of professional courses, core requirements, directed electives, and the opportunity to develop research skills in the field.
Teacher certification in either elementary education, early childhood education, middle level education or a NK–12 special area is required for admission to the program.

Introductory Block 1 (9 credits):
EDTE 502 Focus on Diversity in Education
EDF 516 School and Society
ED 598 Research in Education

Curriculum and Instruction Block 2 (9 credits):
EDEL 508 Current Trends in Elementary Education
EDEL 512 Assessment of Learning
EDEL 529 Analysis of Teaching

Specialization Block 3 (9 credits):
Choose from the following options:
a) Urban Education: Three from EDEL 509, EDEL 485, RDG 586, LING 497
b) Working with Families: Three from SPED 501, SPED 510 or other SPED course approved by advisor; EDEC 553; RDG 586
c) Subject Area Curriculum: Three from FA 490, SCI 555, MATH 506, 507, 508, or 509, EDEL 537, RDG course (500 level)
d) Literacy: Three from 500-level RDG courses or TESOL courses (LING 497 and RDG 586 are recommended.)
e) Summer Through Summer: MATH 531, SCI 555, FA 490. This option would also substitute EDTE 540 and ED 545 for capstone and ED 598; EDTE 510 for EDTE 502.

Capstone Block (6 credits):
EDEL 591 and EDEL 592 (all students will be Plan E). Capstone prerequisite is completion of all Block 1 courses and at least 12 credits in Blocks 2 and 3.

Program Sequence: Students are encouraged to complete the Introductory Block 1 before taking courses in the Curriculum and Instruction and Specialization Blocks 2 and 3. Courses in the Curriculum and Instruction and Specialization Blocks may be taken concurrently with courses from the Introductory Block with permission of advisor.

Note: A maximum of six credits in 400-level courses may be taken with the approval of the graduate advisor.

Post-Master’s Study
A 30-credit planned program of post-master’s study is available in Elementary Education. Programs are planned with a faculty advisor on an individual basis to meet the professional development aspirations of the student.

POST-BACCALAUREATE TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS
Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may pursue teacher certification through our post-baccalaureate programs. These programs prepare students for teacher certification and do not result in a master’s degree. Additional policies governing these certification programs are found in the Undergraduate Catalog. Students can seek certification in the following fields.
• Elementary Education
• Secondary Education in the following subjects: Biology, Business, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, English, French, General Science, German, History, Italian, Mathematics, Physics, Social Studies and Spanish
• NK-12 Education in the following subjects: Art, Music, Physical Education, TESOL, Technology Education
Information on admission to the post-baccalaureate programs can be found on page 53.

Students may enroll part time or full time, extended over a number of years in any certification field. Each student will, together with an advisor, submit a planned program of graduate study which would satisfy all certification requirements. Each planned program is individualized, based on the student’s previous college course work, CCSU program requirements, and state certification requirements.

Student may also apply for full-time study in three specific fields: accelerated math (see page 45), Spanish (see page 47), and the summer through summer program in elementary education.
Students in the summer-through-summer program in elementary education take courses and field experiences in a cohort group and in a specific sequence that begins in one summer and concludes in the following summer. Some credits earned may later be used towards a master’s degree. An additional admissions process is required by the Department of Teacher Education. Students seeking admission to this program should submit their application to the School of Graduate Studies no later than March 1. However, fall applications are strongly encouraged to allow students to take full advantage of financial aid and complete needed prerequisites.

SUMMER THROUGH SUMMER POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
56 credits


Contact: Nancy Hoffman (832-2425)

21 of the 56 credits are later applicable to a Master of Science in Elementary Education

* Indicates course that carries graduate credit toward a M.S. in education degree.

First Summer (14 credits):
EDTE 420 Field Experience Practicum
EDTE 510 Methods of Inquiry into Pedagogy and Leadership in Diverse Communities (field experience required)*
RDG 315 Comprehensive Reading Instruction I
RDG 316 Comprehensive Reading Instruction II
EDT 490 Instructional Computing
EDTE 540 Advanced Seminar in Leadership and Learning Communities*

Fall (17 credits):
EDTE 315 Principles of Learning (field experience required)
SPED 315 Introduction to Educating Learners with Exceptionalities
RDG 412 Literacy in the Elementary School
SCI 555 Teaching of Science in the Elementary School*
EDTE 540 Advanced Seminar in Leadership and Learning Communities*
MATH 531 Basic Concepts of Elementary School Mathematics*

Spring (13 credits):
EDEL 430 Elementary Education Student Teaching
EDTE 540 Advanced Seminar in Leadership and Learning Communities*
Edel 422 Elementary Education General Methods

Second Summer (12 credits):
EDF 415 Educational Foundations
FA 490 Integrating the Fine Arts for the Young Learner*
ED 545 Integration of Methods of Research and Assessment*

OFFICE OF FIELD EXPERIENCES
Student Teaching
Holly Hollander, Director (832-2417)

All students in elementary, all level, secondary, and special education programs who are seeking initial certification by the State of Connecticut are required to complete full-time student teaching. Prospective student teachers must complete a student teaching application form which is available on the Office of Field Experiences Web site. The application and its related materials must be submitted by the given dates. To student teach in the fall semester, applications must be submitted no later than February 15 in the preceding spring semester. Applications to student teach in the spring semester must be submitted no later than September 15 of the preceding fall semester. Students must include their letter of acceptance to the Professional Program of the School of Education and Professional Studies with their application for student teaching. Please refer to the website at http://www.ccsu.edu/ofe for information on additional materials that must accompany application. Applications are accepted by appointment only.
Student teaching courses (EDEC 430, EDEL 430, and EDSC 414, 415, 417, 419, 420, 421, 428, 429 and 435) may not be taken or repeated without permission of the Director of Field Experiences, as well as the chairs of the student’s major department and teacher education. Students may not take any additional courses while student teaching except for the related seminar.


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES CENTERS

The Center for Multicultural Research and Education (Barnard Hall 260) provides a variety of professional development programs and opportunities for K–12 and university faculty that support development of education that is multicultural. Additional goals of the Center include serving as a resource center in the dissemination of research information, articles and curriculum materials, and supporting efforts to recruit students representing diverse cultural backgrounds to the teacher preparation and professional programs.

The Center for Innovation in Teaching and Technology (CITT), located in Barnard Hall 335, provides faculty and students with opportunities to create learning outcomes through using state-of-the-art technology in multi-media, computer-based instruction and other technological delivery systems.

The Literacy Center (Barnard 234) provides a setting for reading and language arts teachers to help children develop reading and language arts skills. Faculty of the Department of Reading and Language Arts direct the operations of the clinic and supervise the activities of students working in the clinic.


 

School of Education TOC | Grad Catalog Home


1615 Stanley Street, New Britain, CT 06050  860.832.CCSU or toll free instate 1-888-733-2278


 
Copyright © 2006 [Central Connecticut State University]. All rights reserved.
webmaster@ccsu.edu
Last Update: Thursday October 15, 2009