Central Connecticut State University

 

 

 

Graduate Student Policies and Degree Requirements



The policies and degree requirements for graduate students at Central Connecticut State University are governed by the University faculty, and administered by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. The Graduate Studies Committee, composed of faculty and graduate students who represent the graduate programs at Central Connecticut State University, reviews graduate curriculum and proposes policies affecting graduate students and programs that then need approval by the Faculty Senate. The Graduate Studies Committee also hears appeals related to student academic matters.

The sections that follow summarize graduate academic policies of the University. All graduate students are urged to become familiar with these policies and to follow them when making decisions about their graduate studies at Central Connecticut State University. The School of Graduate Studies Handbook, available in the Office of the School of Graduate Studies (Barnard Hall), details all policies related to graduate students and programs. Advisors are assigned to assist in planning the academic program, but they are not authorized to change established policy of the University. Advisors and students are responsible for ensuring that the academic program complies with the policies of the University.

THE PLANNED PROGRAM OF GRADUATE STUDY
The Planned Program of graduate study is an official document which lists the courses and other degree requirements that students must finish prior to graduation or recommendation for certification or other non-degree programs.

After a student has been admitted to study for a graduate degree, certification, or program of any kind, the student must consult with the faculty advisor to develop the planned program of graduate study. An approved planned program is required for all graduate programs.

After the advisor has signed the planned program form, it must be submitted by the advisor to the School of Graduate Studies for approval. Once approved by the dean, School of Graduate Studies, or designee it then becomes a formal plan for graduate study and represents a formal agreement between the University and the student. Any changes in the planned program must be approved by the advisor and the Graduate Dean.
“Planned Programs of Graduate Study” forms are provided to the student upon admission. Additional planned program forms and course substitution forms are available in department offices and in the Office of the School of Graduate Studies or the Enrollment Center/Office of Continuing Education. Forms are also found at www.ccsu.edu/grad.

The planned program should be developed with the advisor early in the student’s graduate studies but must be approved prior to the completion of 16 credits of course work. There is no assurance that course work completed prior to admission to a program, or before the planned program has been agreed upon with the academic advisor, will be approved. However, graduate policy stipulates that no more than nine credits taken at the 500 level as a non-matriculated graduate student will be approved for programs requiring 30–35 credits (or 25% of the total credits for programs over 36 credits).

Six-Year Time Limit. All course work and capstone requirements (i.e., dissertations, theses, comprehensive examinations, and special projects) for the degree must be completed during the six years which precede degree conferral. That is, the student has six years from the earliest course listed on the planned program (including any work transferred from another institution or completed prior to matriculation) to complete all degree requirements.

If a student, due to extenuating circumstances, anticipates that he/she will be unable to complete all degree requirements within the six-year time limit, the student may request an extension by writing to the graduate advisor who will forward it with recommendations to the Dean, School of Graduate Studies. When making the request, the student should include the semester and year in which he or she expects to complete the degree and the reason for not meeting the six-year time limit. If the Dean, School of Graduate Studies, deems the request justified, an extension will be granted. However, for programs of 30–35 credits, a maximum of eight years will be allowed in total to complete the degree; for programs of 36 credits or more, a maximum of nine years will be allowed.

Changes in the Planned Program
. A course substitution form must be completed whenever a student wants to modify degree requirements or apply a course not previously included in an approved planned program toward requirements. Requests to change program requirements, which are initiated after the student has started a thesis or attempted after the comprehensive examination, must be approved by the student’s academic department as well as by the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies.

Changes of Program.
To change a graduate program after admission, the student must complete a change of major/advisor form and submit it to the School of Graduate Studies Office. Students must be matriculated and must meet any special requirements of the program to which they are seeking approval for a change. The form will be forwarded to the department that offers the requested program for a decision. The department may also assign conditions for admission.

If the change in program is approved, the student will be notified and assigned a new advisor. The student must then consult with the new advisor to develop a new planned program of graduate study for submission and approval. Subject to approval, course work completed prior to the change in program may be recommended for inclusion on the new planned program at the advisor’s discretion.

Degree Candidacy. Some graduate programs require students to make formal application for degree candidacy following the completion of nine credits (at least six of which must be from the area of specialization) in the planned program of graduate study. Students should consult the academic advisor concerning degree candidacy requirements of the particular program for which they have been accepted.

Admission to degree candidacy involves a formal review of the student’s progress and potential by department faculty and a decision as to whether the student will be permitted to continue in the graduate program. Degree candidates must have a minimum cumulative average of 3.00 and must meet requirements for candidacy established by the academic department.

Recommendations concerning degree candidacy are included in the student’s permanent graduate file. If a student is not approved for degree candidacy, he or she will be withdrawn from graduate study.

Non-Capstone Qualifying Exam. Some graduate programs require qualifying examinations. To be eligible to take the examination, students must complete an application form, which is available in department offices or the School of Graduate Studies, or on the graduate website. Students should submit this form to the Office of the School of Graduate Studies. The academic department will review the application and notify eligible students concerning the time and place of the examination. The department will inform students of the results and forward paperwork to the School of Graduate Studies for inclusion in the student academic record.

Conditional Acceptance Policy. A student who has been conditionally accepted into a graduate program will be given only one opportunity to fulfill all conditions. A second attempt may be granted by the department and the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies in exceptional circumstances; however no student will be granted more than two opportunities to fulfill any conditions.

MASTER’S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

The master’s degree is conferred upon the student who has completed, subject to approval of the faculty and administrative officials, all requirements of the planned program of graduate study. Requirements include a minimum of 30 credits of approved graduate courses and a capstone experience of a master’s thesis (Plan A), a special project such as an art exhibit, performance, or applied research project (Plan C or E), and/or a comprehensive examination (Plan B). The program descriptions section of this catalog explains the capstone options available for each degree program.

Each candidate for the master’s degree is expected to demonstrate ability to present effectively the results of graduate study at the University and to analyze problems related to the area of specialization. Candidates must also maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 (B) on the graduate record at Central Connecticut State University. No more than two courses with grades of C may be carried in the planned program; otherwise such courses may have to be repeated or additional course work be taken and included on the planned program of study. Courses in which students receive a C- or lower will not be counted for graduate credit in the planned program and may not be used to meet prerequisite requirements for graduate courses. Students will be required to retake required courses in which grades of C- or lower are earned. Both grades will remain on the student’s transcript.

Capstone Requirements. All master’s degree programs at Central Connecticut State University include the capstone requirement of a thesis, a special project, and/or a comprehensive examination.

The master’s thesis is required of all graduate students completing degrees under the Plan A option. The thesis represents a report of original scholarship completed under the supervision of a faculty thesis advisor. Depending on department curriculum policy, students receive either three or six credits for completing the thesis requirement.

Students electing to write a thesis, in accordance with department or program policy, will select or be assigned a faculty thesis advisor. Students select a topic in consultation with the thesis advisor. The advisor and committee of a minimum of one additional faculty member must approve the thesis proposal and the thesis prior to the submission of each item to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies. Some departments require their students to give an oral defense of their thesis before it is submitted to the graduate dean, who assures that the thesis meets University standards for format and quality and transmits the thesis to the University library. A thesis handbook is available in the Graduate Office and also on the graduate website.

The following University requirements apply to all students writing theses:
1. Whenever possible, the student’s graduate advisor will serve as the thesis advisor. If the student and the advisor deem it appropriate, another faculty member may be appointed by the department chair to serve as thesis advisor.
2. The student must register for the thesis using the Graduate Capstone Course Registration Form, available at the School of Graduate Studies or at the website. Students must obtain all signatures as required on the form and should register during the regular registration period. To register, students must have a minimum grade point average of 3.00 and at least 18 credits completed in programs of 30–35 credits or 24 credits completed in programs with greater than 35 credits.
3. Students intending to complete a thesis should consult The Master’s Thesis Guide, available in the School of Graduate Studies Office and also at the graduate website.
4. The thesis must be prepared in a style and format appropriate to the discipline and approved by the dean of the School of Graduate Studies. Among the currently approved styles are APA, MLA, Campbell, and Turabian.
5. A copy of the approved thesis proposal must be submitted to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies by the thesis advisor.
6. Two copies of the approved thesis, one original for binding by the library and one copy, plus three additional copies of the thesis abstract (not to exceed 200–300 words and one to two pages) must be submitted to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies. A digitized copy of the thesis is also required.
7. If a student planning to graduate in May wishes the thesis to be included in the May Commencement Program, the thesis must be submitted by April 15 of the year in which the student plans to graduate. If a student planning to graduate in December wishes the thesis to be included in the December Commencement Program, the thesis must be submitted by November 15 of the year in which the student plans to graduate.

The comprehensive examination is required of all students who select the Plan B option. The comprehensive examination covers the course work in the student’s planned program. At the option of the department, the comprehensive examination may include an oral examination and/or an oral defense of the written examination.

The comprehensive examination is normally taken during the last semester of study, but may be attempted any time after the completion of at least 75% of planned program requirements. Exceptions may be granted with the recommendation of the advisor and permission of the dean, School of Graduate Studies. Students are required to have a minimum 3.00 grade point average at the time of application. Examinations are given each fall and spring semester and, at the discretion of the academic department, during the summer. Students should consult their advisors and/or department chairs concerning the availability of a summer session comprehensive examination.

To be eligible to take the examination, students must complete an application form, which is available in department offices or the Graduate Office, or on the graduate website. Students should submit this form to the Office of the School of Graduate Studies no later than October 1 for fall semester examinations, and no later than February 15 for spring semester examinations. The academic department will notify students concerning the time and place of the examination and will inform students of the results.

With departmental permission, students may retake the comprehensive examination. Students who do not pass the examination on a first attempt may be required to enroll in additional course work or to make other special preparations for reexamination. Students who fail the examination a second time must appeal to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies for permission to retake the examination.

Students who elect the Plan C or E option must complete a special project. In general, the special project involves completion of a body of applied work appropriate to the degree specialty. The availability of this option and the requirements for the special project vary according to the degree program. However, all special projects, both Plan C and E, must include as a minimum an abstract, a definition of the project, project objective (purpose, rationale for conducting the project), a review of literature, research methods or a plan for the project, results or findings, summary or conclusions, and bibliography or references, as well as appendixes, if appropriate. The department must specify the style and format to be used and whether an oral defense is required.

For Plan C, the faculty advisor or another faculty member in the department will supervise the project. The student’s work will be evaluated by the advisor and by at least one other faculty member as determined by departmental requirements.

Students in a Plan C special project must register using the Graduate Capstone Course Registration Form, available at the School of Graduate Studies or at the website. Students must obtain all signatures as required on the form and should register during the regular registration period. To register, students must have a minimum grade point average of 3.00 and at least 18 credits completed in programs of 30–35 credits or 24 credits completed in programs with greater than 35 credits. The special project proposal will not be approved until the student has registered for the course.

A copy of the approved special project proposal must be submitted to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies by the advisor. When the special project is completed, two copies of the approved special project must be submitted to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies.

Students in a Plan E special project will register for the designated special project departmental course. To register, students must have a minimum grade point average of 3.00 and at least 18 credits completed in programs of 30–35 credits or 24 credits completed in programs with greater than 35 credits. The student’s work will be evaluated by the course instructor and by other members of the department as appropriate.

Students should consult the program descriptions section of this catalog concerning availability of a Plan C or E option and discuss with their advisors the department’s requirements for the special project. Students normally receive three credits upon successful completion of their project.

DOCTORAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
At time of admission, all candidates must commit to summer study. Courses and learning experiences are sequenced over four summers and three academic years. The program is limited to admitting 25 students in alternate years. They proceed through the program as a cohort, taking the same required courses and having the same experiences. If candidates are able to keep up with their cohort and do their dissertation in the planned one-year period of time, the program can be completed in three and one-half years.

The Ed.D. degree is conferred upon the student who has completed, subject to approval of the faculty and administrative officials, all requirements of the planned program of graduate study. Requirements include a minimum of 63 credits beyond the master’s degree of approved graduate courses and a dissertation. A dissertation is different from a thesis. The dissertation in the Ed.D. program focuses on the translation of theory to practice. It is connected to the candidate’s research interest and is expected to break new ground by providing a bridge between what is known from research and what needs to be done in practice. Each candidate is responsible for identifying a dissertation advisor, choosing a dissertation topic with the dissertation advisor, and completing the dissertation as outlined in the department’s approval processes and described in detail in the Assessment and Dissertation Handbook.

THE SIXTH-YEAR CERTIFICATE
The sixth-year certificate is presently offered in educational leadership and in reading. The certificate is awarded, subject to faculty approval, to students who complete all requirements of the planned program.

All course work and any related requirements for the sixth-year certificate must be completed as specified within the “Six-Year Time Limit” section.

GRADUATE TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS
After the student has been admitted, requirements for teacher certification at the graduate level will be individually prescribed through a transcript evaluation by an advisor in the School of Education and Professional Studies and departmental subject advisor when applicable. Certification requirements include not only course work (such as completion of undergraduate requirements for appropriate subject majors, professional education, and student teaching) but also the satisfactory completion of all requirements for admission to the Professional Program of the School of Education and Professional Studies.

Students are advised to contact their advisor as soon as possible after they are admitted to graduate study. For current information concerning Connecticut and University requirements for certification, they may consult the Office of the Dean, School of Education and Professional Studies. Students completing planned programs of teacher certification programs do not participate in graduation ceremonies.

OFFICIAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Official Certificate Programs (OCP) are defined as academic programs of study that have been through a complete University curricular review and approval process, but which do not lead directly to a formal degree. These programs are designed for people interested in developing expertise in a particular field of study, but who do not wish to complete formal degree requirements. The advantage to these programs is that they are formal programs of study, in which students may be matriculated, pursue their studies on a full- or part-time basis, and may be eligible for financial aid. Most importantly, these programs are coordinated by faculty closely tied to the area of interest who are committed to advising students enrolled in these programs, ensuring that the student is best able to achieve his or her educational goals. Requirements for Official Certificate Programs at the graduate level will be individually prescribed by the program director after the student has been admitted to Graduate Studies. When requirements have been completed, students are issued a certificate from the dean, School of Graduate Studies. Students completing planned programs of certificate programs do not participate in graduation ceremonies.

POST-MASTER’S PLANNED PROGRAMS

The Sixth-Year Certificate is awarded only in two fields of study at CCSU. Students wishing to pursue post-master’s study in other areas may request admission to a planned program of post-master’s study. Thirty-credit planned programs of graduate study beyond the master’s degree are individually prescribed programs of advanced study which are developed with an advisor. Students develop a planned program with their advisor. All requirements must be completed within a six-year time period dating from the earliest course included on the planned program. When requirements have been completed, students may request an official letter from the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies which documents that they have completed 30 credits in a planned program of graduate study beyond the requirements for a master’s degree. Completion of post-master’s requirements is also noted in the student’s official University record. Students completing planned programs of post-master’s study do not participate in graduation ceremonies.

GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH

In compliance with federal regulations, CCSU has a policy in effect which states that all research (including research conducted by graduate students) using human subjects must be reviewed and approved by CCSU Human Studies Council (HSC). Proposals must be submitted for review prior to data collection, as there is a strict policy that no research will be reviewed retroactively. Information regarding the HSC and the proposal submission process can be found at www.ccsu.edu/humanstudies.

If research involves the use of animals, CCSU policy mandates that approval must be sought from the CCSU Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). Application materials may be obtained by contacting the IACUC chair.

Students may also refer to the Master’s Thesis Handbook or contact the School of Graduate Studies or the Office of Sponsored Programs for more detailed information regarding conducting research.

ENROLLING IN GRADUATE COURSES
Information about registration and fees is provided beginning on page 20. This section includes information about course numbers, enrollment, and withdrawal from graduate study.

Course Numbering System. The following numbering system is used by Central Connecticut State University:
001–099 Non-credit courses
100 Search courses (under-
graduate credit)
101–199 Courses open to first-year
students, and in general to
all undergraduate students
200–299 Courses open to sopho-
mores, and in general to all
undergraduate students
300–399 Courses open to juniors,
and in general to sopho-
mores, juniors, and seniors
400–499 Courses open to seniors,
and in general to juniors,
seniors, and graduate
students. Additional work
is required for graduate
students to earn graduate
credit.
500–599 Graduate courses; under-
graduates, who meet
requirements of a
minimum 3.00 GPA and
90 credits of study, may
request registrations by
obtaining approval
of undergraduate advisor,
instructor, chair of the
department offering the
course, and and dean of the
School of Graduate Studies,
who will give preferential
admission to graduate
students.
600–699 Graduate courses open only
to master’s, sixth-year, and
doctoral students.
700–799 Graduate courses open only
to doctoral students

Courses numbered 400 and above may be included in a planned program of graduate study when they are listed in the graduate catalog and the course description so allows and/or when approved by the advisor and the dean, School of Graduate Studies. Students may have a maximum of nine credits (and in some cases zero to six, depending on the program) at the 400 level as approved by the program advisor. Graduate students enrolled in 400-level classes are required to do additional work as compared to their undergraduate classmates.
Courses numbered under 400 may be applied toward teacher certification and official certificate programs when recommended by the advisor but will not be approved for inclusion in a master’s degree program.

Maximum Course Load. Students who register as part-time students in the Enrollment Center/Office of Continuing Education may enroll for a maximum of eight credits. Students who register as full-time students enroll for no fewer than nine credits, and up to a maximum of 15 credits.

Adding a Course.
Students may add courses on a space-available basis (that is, enroll in courses in addition to those for which they have previously registered) prior to the scheduled beginning and through the first eight days of each semester. All students add courses in the Enrollment Center/
Office of Continuing Education. Capstone and independent study courses also may be added within this same period; however specific forms are used that require signatures including that of the dean, School of Graduate Studies. Registration after a semester’s scheduled beginning is dependent on course enrollment and/or the willingness of the instructor, department chair, and dean(s) to approve an additional student.

Dropping a Course. Dropping courses will be allowed up to the last day of the third week of classes during a regular semester. If a full-time graduate student drops below nine credits, the student must change status from full-time to part-time. Requests for dropping a course must be in writing; a confirmation copy of this will be given to the student. Courses dropped by the deadline do not appear on the student’s transcript. Forms are available in the Enrollment Center/Office of Continuing Education, Willard Hall, and in the Registrar’s Office, Davidson Hall. The deadline for dropping all full-semester courses is included in the Enrollment Center/Office of Continuing Education bulletin and in the schedule of classes provided by the Registrar’s Office.
Warning: Failure to carry a minimum of nine credits may affect Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) and receipt of certain federal, state, and other benefits, including but not limited to various financial aid programs, Veterans benefits, and Social Security benefits. Students dropping below nine credits are ineligible for participation in intercollegiate athletics. In addition, full-time graduate assistants must carry a minimum of nine credits.

Withdrawing from a Course. Graduate students, full-time or part-time, can withdraw from any class during the fourth week to the end of the eighth week by going to the Registrar’s Office or the Enrollment Center/Office of Continuing Education and completing a two-part withdrawal request form. No approval is necessary if completed by the deadline. A “W” will appear on the transcript in all cases of withdrawal; no exceptions. After the eighth week of classes, withdrawals are only permissible under extenuating circumstances after recommendation of the instructor and chair, and approval of appropriate dean(s). Poor academic performance is not considered an extenuating circumstance. A “W” appears on the transcript. If a student stops attending and fails to officially withdraw from a course, a grade of “F” will be recorded on the student’s record.

“Bridge” Course. A “bridge” course is an entry-level graduate course which may share lectures with a specific advanced undergraduate (400-level) capstone course that is integral to each program (undergraduate and graduate). Each of these courses will have different numbers, titles, syllabi, and requirements. Undergraduate bridge courses must not have graduate credit.

“Link” Course. A “link” course is a graduate course which may share lectures with a specific advanced undergraduate (400-level) course on the same topic. These courses may be electives. Each of these courses will have different numbers, titles, syllabi, and requirements. Undergraduate link courses must not have graduate credit.

Withdrawing from the Graduate Program. A full-time student who wishes to withdraw in good standing from all course work in progress during the current semester at the University must consult with the Registrar or designee and file all appropriate forms.

A part-time student who wishes to withdraw in good standing from all course work in progress during the current semester must consult with the director or a designee in the Enrollment Center/Office of Continuing Education (Willard Hall).

Any student who no longer wishes to pursue a graduate degree program must provide written notification to the School of Graduate Studies. Readmission into a graduate program will be contingent on the student’s academic standing. Students obtain forms for reentry in the Graduate Office or Graduate Admissions. If the student subsequently wishes to resume full-time graduate study within two years, a Request for Reinstatement form must be submitted through Graduate Admissions. After two years, students must reapply by filing a re-enrollment form and paying a fee of $50 to resume their studies.

THE GRADING SYSTEM

Letter grades, including their plus and minus combinations, are utilized by the School of Graduate Studies. The following grade point equivalents will be used to compute cumulative grade averages: A (4.0); A- (3.7); B+ (3.3); B (3.0); B- (2.7); C+ (2.3); C (2.0); C- (1.7); D+ (1.3); D (1.0); D- (0.7); F (0.0). No planned program credit is awarded for grades of C- or below, but all grades received in post-baccalaureate status at Central Connecticut State University remain on the graduate transcript and are included in the student’s cumulative grade average. Additional grades used at CCSU include:

Inc     Incomplete
Aud    Audit (no credit)
NC     Satisfactory completion of a
         non-credit course offered
         through the Enrollment
         Center/Office of
         Continuing Education
U       Unsatisfactory performance
         in a non-credit course


The Pass/Fail grading option is not available to graduate students.

Incomplete Grades. A grade of Incomplete may be recorded at the discretion of the instructor when a student, for circumstances which cannot be controlled, is unable to complete the requirements of a course in which he or she is registered during the current semester or session.

The student who receives a grade of Incomplete will be responsible for assuring that all course requirements are completed within one calendar year of issuance, or sooner if required by the instructor. A grade of Incomplete which has not been changed by the instructor within the year allowed for course completion will become an F (failure) automatically. (This latter policy does not refer to grades of Incomplete received for capstone theses or special projects.)

Grade Appeals. Academic grading reflects careful and deliberate judgment by the faculty member instructing a course. However, the University recognizes that there may, on occasion, be an error or injustice in the determination of a final grade for a course.

Any student who believes that a final grade involved an error or a palpable injustice should confer with the instructor who awarded the grade no later than the fourth week of the following regular academic semester (fall/spring). If the outcome is not satisfactory, the student may present the case next to the department chair who may effect a settlement upon written agreement with the instructor. Further appeal shall be to the dean of the appropriate academic school, and, if no settlement can be effected, to the Grade Appeals Review Board of the Academic Standards Committee. The full text of the Appeals for Grade Changes Policy may be found on page 38 of the 2005–07 Undergraduate Catalog.

Non-Graded Appeals. A formalized process for appealing non-graded, performance-based assessments, such as comprehensive examinations, degree candidacy, etc., has been established by the Graduate Studies Committee. Similar to grade appeals, a student who believes that an error or a palpable injustice has occurred should first confer with the department to which the appeal is directed. If the outcome is not satisfactory, further appeal shall be to the dean of the appropriate academic school. If no settlement can be effected, the student should bring the appeal to the Standing Appeals Committee of the Graduate Studies Committee. (Contact may be made through the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, 102 Barnard Hall.) The Graduate Appeals Committee will meet as a group to determine whether there is merit to an appeal of a non-graded, performance-based assessment by reviewing documents and records that are presented with the appeal. If the Appeals Committee believes that additional information is needed, the committee will request clarification from the department and/or student. The Committee’s determination will be based on whether the student was denied due process. The Appeals Committee will render its decision in writing by notifying the graduate student and copying the graduate dean.

TRANSCRIPT POLICY
A transcript is the complete, unabridged academic record, without deletions or omissions, compiled while at Central Connecticut State University. Upon the granting of a degree or completion of a program, a student’s transcript is considered officially sealed, meaning no changes in grades or alteration in courses will be made unless that student believes that the information in his or her transcript is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his or her rights of privacy. It is a student’s responsibility to review and confirm the accuracy of his or her academic record. A student may view his or her transcript at any time on the Web to verify its content. It is recommended that the degree recipient confirm the accuracy of all grades, honors, terms, and cumulative GPA notations at the time final grades are posted to their academic record, on or about graduation.

It is a student’s responsibility to notify the Office of the Registrar, in writing, of the information in the transcript that he or she believes is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his or her rights of privacy. A student who believes that his or her transcript is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his or her rights of privacy has the right to request an amendment to the transcript and, if this request is denied, the right to an opportunity for a hearing to challenge the content of the transcript on the ground that it is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his or her rights of privacy. If, as a result of the hearing, the student’s request is denied, the University shall inform the student of the right to place a statement with the transcript, commenting on the contested information in the record or stating why he or she disagrees with the decision of the University, or both.

GOOD ACADEMIC STANDING

All graduate students must maintain a 3.00 (B) cumulative grade point average (CPA) in course work at Central Connecticut State University in order to be in good academic standing. Good academic standing is required to receive financial aid and to graduate.

DISMISSAL, PROBATION POLICIES
Students who drop below a 3.00 average will receive a letter from the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, informing them that they are no longer in good academic standing and that they have been placed on academic probation or dismissed from their program. Once a letter is received, the student is expected to promptly meet with the Graduate Dean and provide an explanation for his/her poor performance. If a student receives a letter of dismissal and fails to meet with the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies as recommended in the letter, the student’s schedule will be dropped and he/she will be withdrawn from his/her program. A student who is dropped from the program and who wishes to reapply must do so through the School of Graduate Studies. The Graduate Dean, in consultation with the department offering the program, will decide whether the student may continue with his/her studies. Continuation will be contingent upon the student’s progress in meeting the requirements for good academic standing, as well as other materials as required.

In addition to grade-point requirements for good academic standing, students should note that no more than two grades of C are permitted for courses included on the planned program of graduate study leading to a doctoral or master’s degree or sixth-year certificate. Students who receive more than two grades of C, or who achieve grades low enough so that, in the judgment of the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, they will not be able to attain the 3.00 CPA required for graduation, will be dismissed from the graduate program.

Students who are dismissed for academic reasons may appeal first to the dean, School of Graduate Studies. If an unfavorable decision is rendered, they may then appeal to the Graduate Studies Committee.
Students who are dismissed from graduate study may request reenrollment upon attainment of a 3.00 (B) cumulative grade point average on the Central Connecticut State University graduate record. Forms for requesting file reenrollment are available in the Graduate Admissions Office and the Office of the School of Graduate Studies and at www.ccsu.edu/grad.  Along with submitting the reenrollment form to Graduate Admissions, the student must submit to the department offering the program any additional materials that are required by the department for the its review of the file. A department may also consider prior performance in the program when reviewing a student’s file who has been formally dismissed by the School of Graduate Studies.

Students who are dismissed from a graduate program will not be allowed to take courses for graduate credit unless they have the permission of the instructor, the chair of the department offering the course, and the dean, School of Graduate Studies.

TRANSFER OF GRADUATE CREDIT IN DEGREE PROGRAMS
Students may request transfer of credit for graduate courses completed at another regionally-accredited institution of higher education. All credit presented for transfer must show an earned grade of 3.00 (B) or higher, must be included on the student’s planned program of graduate study at Central Connecticut State University, and must be completed within the six-year period preceding graduation and conferral of the graduate degree. Courses which were applied to a previously completed degree will not be transferred to a new degree program.

The amount of graduate work transferable to a graduate degree program is limited to a maximum of nine credits for programs requiring 30 to 35 credits or 25 percent of the total credits for programs requiring 36 credits or more, not including prerequisites. (Some programs may have more stringent policies.) In order to be transferred, a course or courses must be determined to be:

• graduate level from an accredited
institution authorized to grant graduate
degrees;
• passed with an earned grade of 3.00 (B)
or higher (Pass/fail courses may not be
transferred);
• within the six-year limit at the time of
graduation from CCSU;
• recorded on an official transcript from
the granting institution; and
• included on the planned program by the
graduate program advisor.


Students who have been admitted to a graduate program must obtain prior written approval from the advisor and the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies if they wish to take a course at another institution for transfer into their planned program of graduate study. Forms for requesting transfer and substitution of credit are available in the Office of the School of Graduate Studies and the Enrollment Center/Office of Continuing Education. Students who do not receive prior approval may not be able to use courses from other institutions as part of their planned programs. Students are responsible for requesting that an official transcript of any approved transfer courses is sent to the School of Graduate Studies Office.

Graduate students are advised that the Connecticut Department of Higher Education as well as our various accrediting organizations have very strict policies concerning the recognition of credit awarded by non-collegiate institutions. The University does not presently have any agreements with non-collegiate institutions which allow for recognition and transfer of credit. Students should also be aware that “continuing education units” (CEU’s) may not be transferred to graduate degree programs or applied toward the completion of graduate degree requirements.

DEGREE RECEIPT AND GRADUATION
Upon completion of all applicable course and capstone requirements for the doctoral degree, master’s degree, or sixth-year certificate, students are eligible to receive their degree and to graduate. However, degree award and graduation are not automatic. While a student may have completed all applicable course and capstone requirements for their program, every degree candidate is required to notify the University about program conclusion by filing a graduate-level Application for Graduation form with the School of Graduate Studies. Not submitting an Application for Graduation in a timely manner may result in failure to receive the appropriate degree for the requested semester. Further, if a degree-seeking student fails to finish all requirements by the completion date indicated on the submitted Application for Graduation, a new application must be filed.

Central Connecticut State University confers degrees three times during the academic year: May, August, and December. Students expecting to receive degrees during any of these periods must complete all applicable program requirements by the last official day of the semester or session in which the degree is to be awarded.

Students who anticipate finishing degree requirements during the spring semester (May completion) should submit the Application for Graduation no later than March 1. Students who anticipate finishing degree requirements during the summer sessions (August completion) should submit the Application for Graduation no later than April 1. Students who plan to finish degree requirements during the fall semester (December completion) should submit the Application for Graduation no later than September 15. Graduate-level Application for Graduation forms are available in the office of the School of Graduate Studies and on the website, as well as in other areas on campus.

All students who submit an Application for Graduation and expect to receive the doctoral degree, master’s degree, or sixth-year certificate are eligible to participate in formal University-wide commencement ceremonies. Students who complete degree requirements in the spring semester are scheduled to participate in the May commencement ceremony. Students who complete degree requirements in summer sessions or the fall semester are scheduled to participate in the December commencement ceremony. Information about commencement ceremonies will be mailed to all eligible students who then inform the University whether they plan to participate.

STUDENT REGULATIONS AND CONDUCT

Graduate students at Central Connecticut State University are expected to follow University regulations outlined in the Survival Guide: Student Handbook 2006 (available online at www.ccsu.edu/Students/SurvivaL) and the School of Graduate Studies Handbook (available from the Office of the School of Graduate Studies, Barnard Hall). These handbooks describe in detail the code of student conduct and subsequent disciplinary actions that may occur as a result of violations of this code. Policies of particular importance to graduate students are summarized below.

Attendance. Regular attendance for classes is expected of all graduate students and may be a course requirement. Frequent absences can result in a lowered grade or possible course failure.

Policy on Academic Misconduct. At Central Connecticut State University we value personal integrity as fundamental to our interactions with each other. We believe that one of the purposes of a University education is for students to learn to think critically, to develop evaluative skills, and to express their own opinions and voices. We place special weight on academic honesty in all of our intellectual pursuits because it is a value that is fundamental to academic life and scholarly practice. All members of the University community are obligated to uphold high standards of academic honesty in their scholarship and learning. Therefore, we expect students to take personal responsibility for their intellectual work and to respect and acknowledge the ideas of others. Academic honesty means doing one’s own work and giving proper credit to others whose work and thought one may draw upon. It is the responsibility of each student to become familiar with what constitutes academic dishonesty and plagiarism and to avoid all forms of cheating and plagiarism.

The CSU code of conduct, Guidelines for Student Rights and Responsibilities and Judicial Procedures, defines academic misconduct as including, but “not limited to, providing or receiving assistance from another, in a manner not authorized by the instructor, in the creation of work to be submitted for academic evaluation (including papers, projects, and examinations). Plagiarism is defined as presenting, as one’s own, the ideas or words of another person, for academic evaluation, without proper acknowledgement.”

Cheating may take many forms. It includes, but is not limited to, the following actions, unless explicitly authorized by the instructor:

Exams:
• Copying from another person’s paper or receiving unauthorized aid from another person during an examination;
• Use of unauthorized materials or devices during an examination or any other form of academic evaluation and grading; e.g., use of signals, notes, books, or calculators during an examination when the instructor has not approved their use;
• Knowingly allowing another person to copy from one’s paper during an examination.

Improper Behavior:
• Use of another person as a substitute in any form of academic evaluation or acting as a substitute for another person in any form of academic evaluation; e.g., a student cannot have another person take an examination for him/her;
• Acquisition or distribution of improperly acquired examinations; e.g., stealing examinations before the test period or taking a copy of an examination from a testing room without the permission of the instructor. (Examinations which have been distributed by an instructor are legitimate study tools.);
• Submission of another’s material as one’s own for academic evaluation;
• Preparation of work for another student to submit for academic evaluation;
• Unauthorized collaboration in the preparation of materials to be submitted for academic evaluation; e.g., working with another student on an assignment when the instructor has not authorized working together;
• Submission of the same work, or substantially similar work, in more than one course without prior consent of the evaluating instructor(s);
• Disruption in classroom, lab, or research and study areas; any conduct or actions that grossly or persistently interferes with the academic process. (See Rights and Responsibilities, “Prohibited Conduct,” Survival Guide: Student Handbook 2006.)

Falsification or Misuse of Academic Information:
• Falsification or misrepresentation of one’s own academic record or that of anyone else; e.g., altering a transcript for admission, hacking into the University’s computer system and changing a grade, having another student take an examination in one’s place, signing someone else’s name to an attendance sheet.
• Unauthorized use of information in University computer records or the computer files of other students (see Computer Use Policy);
• Using unauthorized materials or fabricated data in an academic exercise; e.g., falsifying data in a research paper or laboratory activity; conducting research on human or animal subjects without review by the appropriate panel or supervisor.

Plagiarism:
• Copying sentences, phrases, paragraphs, tables, figures, or data directly or in slightly modified form from a book, article, or other academic source without using quotation marks or giving proper acknowledgment to the original author or source.
• Copying information from Internet Web sites and submitting it as one’s own work;
• Buying papers for the purpose of turning them in as one’s own work;
• Selling or lending of papers for the purpose of violating academic honesty policies. (This may also be an academic crime, see Connecticut General Statutes, §53-392a.)

Understanding Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is presenting another person’s work without acknowledgements, whether in the same or in slightly modified form. In academic practice this is regarded as theft, intended to gain undeserved credit. Like other forms of academic dishonesty, plagiarism is cheating. To academicians, a well-documented paper is more impressive than one which arouses the suspicion of a reader who is familiar with the student’s work and alert to echoes of other writers. The proper use of outside sources does not necessarily mean that a paper is lacking in originality, nor does the presence of quotation marks in the text. In fact, the purpose of research and documentation is to share useful information with the reader. The penalties for plagiarism greatly exceed the unlikely reward of gaining credit by getting away with it. Students must be careful to avoid plagiarism and are responsible for learning how to present the ideas of others in their own work. For current documentation practice, student should consult the instructor and a style manual. When material is borrowed from another person, the source must be indicated. There are three ways in which another writer’s material may appear:
1. By putting quotation marks around short passages borrowed verbatim (word for word); or by setting off from the text, without quotation marks, for longer quotations.
2. By précis: condensing part of a writer’s argument.
3. By paraphrase: interpretation of a writer’s ideas.
All three must be acknowledged either in footnotes or informally in the text.

Consequence of Academic Misconduct:
• There are significant consequences when a graduate student engages in academic misconduct.
• In each case the faculty member will initiate a conference with the student, after which the faculty member who believes that misconduct has occurred must complete a University Academic Misconduct Report, which is the record of a faculty member’s determination that the student identified in the report has engaged in academic misconduct. The content of a University Academic Misconduct Report shall include all items indicated in the form attached to this policy.
• A copy of each University Academic Misconduct Report will be sent to the student, the department chairperson, the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies, and the University Judicial Officer.
• Upon receipt of the University Academic Misconduct Report, the University judicial officer with the dean, School of Graduate Studies, in consultation with the faculty member, may initiate further proceedings, which may result in sanctions, including disciplinary probation, suspension, or expulsion from the University.
• The sanctions for academic misconduct available to a faculty member include any or all of the following:
1. A grade of “F” for the course.
2. A grade of “F” for the material being
evaluated.
3. A reduced grade for the material
being evaluated.
4. The assigning of additional course
work.

When Graduate Students are Suspected of Academic Misconduct:
1. When a faculty member reasonably believes that there is sufficient information to demonstrate that a student may have engaged in Academic Misconduct:
a. The faculty member will discuss the incident with the student, in the presence of the department chair, if the faculty member or student so desires.
b. At this time the faculty member shall outline the possible penalties as specified in the Survival Guide: Student Handbook 2006.
c. The faculty member will indicate that the matter may be referred to the Graduate Dean or the University Judicial Officer for possible disciplinary action.
2. Based on the available documentation, the response offered by the student, if any, and other relevant information:
a. The faculty member will, within a reasonable period of time, reach a determination whether the student has engaged in Academic Misconduct.
b. Should the faculty member determine that Academic Misconduct has occurred, the faculty member shall retain evidence of the said misconduct.
3. If the faculty member determines that Academic Misconduct has not occurred, no University Academic Misconduct Report need be prepared.
4. If the faculty member determines that Academic Misconduct has occurred, the faculty member shall:
a. Impose an academic sanction and,
b. Prepare and forward to the dean, School of Graduate Studies, and judicial officer, a University Academic Misconduct Report indicating the determination reached and sanctions imposed and,
c. Inform the student that additional University Academic Misconduct Reports may result in more severe penalties.
5. The faculty member:
a. May contact the Graduate Dean or the University Judicial Officer to request a conference with the student to further explain the act leading to the University Academic Misconduct Report. The conference will be facilitated by the Graduate Dean and include the University Judicial Officer, a Graduate Studies Committee member not affiliated with the graduate program of the student, and the graduate student. This meeting will not be a disciplinary hearing, but a consultation with the student to further explain the misconduct.
b. May request a disciplinary hearing with the Graduate Dean and the University Judicial Officer in cases of serious forms of academic misconduct.
6. In accordance with the “Student Records and Directory Information Policy,” the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records, including “the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.” (Survival Guide: Student Handbook 2006).
Subsequent Violations of the Academic Misconduct Policy:
When the University Judicial Officer or the Graduate Dean has multiple University Academic Misconduct Reports filed on a particular student, a “Pre-Hearing Investigation” may be conducted in anticipation of disciplinary action, which may result in disciplinary probation, suspension, or expulsion from the University. If the University Judicial Officer or the Graduate Dean determines that a formal hearing is warranted, a faculty member or members may be requested to provide information.

A Student’s Rights When Suspected and/ or Charged with Academic Misconduct:
1. A student has the right:
a. To meet with the faculty member, in the presence of the department chair if so desired, before any determination has been made.
b. To be informed during this meeting of the faculty member’s suspicions and have an opportunity to discuss the matter.
c. To appeal a finding of Academic Misconduct made during the course of the semester, within 10 school days of being provided with a University Academic Misconduct Report. A written statement of appeal must be provided to the faculty member, the department chairperson, the Graduate Dean, and the University Judicial Officer, setting forth the basis of the student’s appeal. Upon receipt of a student’s mid-semester appeal, the university judicial officer will consult with the faculty member, the department chair, and the graduate dean and communicate to the student within 10 school days the results of the student’s appeal.
2. Once a final grade is awarded, the student may file a grade appeal in accordance with the “Appeals for Grade Change Policy.”
3 If a student receives a final grade of “F” as a result of violating the Academic Misconduct Policy, and that grade is upheld by the grade appeal process, no retroactive withdrawal from the course will be permitted.
4. All end of the semester appeals must be made in accordance with the “Appeals for Grade Change Policy.”
5. In addition to academic sanctions provided by the faculty member, if disciplinary proceedings have been initiated by the University’s judicial officer or the dean, School of Graduate Studies, a student has the right to have such proceedings resolved in accordance with the “Rights and Responsibilities” (Survival Guide: Student Handbook 2006).

Professor’s Responsibilities When Academic Misconduct is Suspected During End of the Semester Grading:
If a faculty member reasonably suspects academic misconduct during end of the semester grading, a grade of Incomplete may be entered to be replaced by an appropriate grade once the issue is resolved. The grade of Incomplete allows a faculty member to complete end of the semester grading and still follow up on suspected violations of the University Academic Misconduct Policy.
For Academic Misconduct, reported by a member of the University Community other than the relevant faculty member, please refer to “Academic Misconduct” in “Rights and Responsibilities” (Survival Guide: Student Handbook 2006).

Computer Use. The campus computing facilities are available to graduate students to facilitate educational objectives, research, and study. In exercising computer privileges, graduate students are expected to follow University rules and regulations governing the use of computer accounts and equipment. These regulations are found in the Survival Guide: Student Handbook 2006.


 

Grad Student Policies TOC | Grad Catalog Home


1615 Stanley Street, New Britain, CT 06050  860.832.CCSU or toll free instate 1-888-733-2278


 
Copyright © 2006 [Central Connecticut State University]. All rights reserved.
webmaster@ccsu.edu
Last Update: Thursday October 15, 2009