Self-Compatibility of the genus Jaltomata (Solanaceae)

revised 29 Sep 2017
Link to Jaltomata homepage The information on this page may be cited as a communication with professor Thomas Mione, Central Connecticut State University, Biology Department, Copernicus Hall, 1615 Stanley Street, New Britain, Connecticut 06050-4010, United States of America.
Link to description of the genus Jaltomata

It is likely that all species of the genus Jaltomata are self-compatible: during nearly two decades of growing Jaltomata I have noticed that plants usually set fruit abundantly even in a pollinator-free greenhouse.

Self-compatible:

J. aijana "self-compatible" Kostyun, personal communication 2013, cultivation of Mione 726
J. antillana Mione 1992, page 27
J. auriculata Mione 1992, page 27
J. biflora Mione et al. 2001
J. bohsiana see this species' web page for details
J. calliantha Plourd & Mione 2016
J. chihuahuensis Mione & Bye 1996, page 79
J. dendroidea Kostyun, personal communication 2016
J. darcyana Mione & Yacher, 2005
J. grandiflora see this species' web page for details
J. incahuasina "self-compatible" Kostyun, personal communication 2013, cultivation of Mione 816
J. paneroi Mione & Leiva, 1997
J. procumbens see this species' web page
J. quipuscoae Mione and students, unpublished
J. Kostyun, personal communication 2016, cultivation of Mione 798
J. repandidentata Polsgrove, Mione & Anderson 1993, Powell 2007
J. sagastegui Mione & Coe, 1996
J. sanchez-vegae see this species' web page for details
J. sinuosa Mione et al. 2017
J. umbellata in Feb 1992 I wrote in my notes "at least occasionally self-sets fruit in greenhouse";
"self-compatible" Kostyun, personal communication 2013, cultivation of Mione 432
J. weberbaueri "self-compatible" Kostyun, personal communication 2016
J. weigendiana Mione and students, unpublished

It is possible that the combination of self-compatibility, predominant homogamy and presumed bird dispersal of fruits allowed Jaltomata to be successful at colonizing Islands (Galápagos Islands, one species; Greater Antilles, one species; virtual islands known as lomas formations along the coast of Peru, seven species; virtual island Baja California, one widespread species).

Igic, Bohs and Kohn (2004) reported that "SI was ancestral in the Solanaceae, with transitions to SC common and irreversible" and mention Jaltomata in their paper.

Literature Cited

 

Link to protogyny page