CCSU Faculty Senate

Minutes—December 11, 2000

Founders Hall  3:00 PM

Members Present: Adams, Abadiano, Altieri, Baratta, Benfield, Best, Brann, Braverman, Calvert, Carter, Carter-Lowery, Cassela, Chasse, Chen, Cohen, Crundwell, Czyrnik, Fried, Garcia, Glarner, Halkin, Harmon, Hermes, Jackson, Jones, Johnson, Larkin, Larose, Lee, Leake, Lemaire, Lowery, Martin-Troy, Markov, Morales, Perreault, Rohinsky, Sarisley, Schipke, Stanley, Stoneback, Tenny, Thornton, Walo, Wolff.

Ex-Officio Members Present: V.P Bartelt, Deans Miller and Kremens, E. Demos (Ex. Asst to Pres.) P. Lemma (Grad. Studies) L. Deane (Univ. Council).

Guests: Paul Petterson, Chair, Curriculum Committee, Leyla Zidani-Eroglu (English), Roy Temple (Media Center), Paloma Lapuerta (Mod.Lang.) Francis Keefe (Advising center), Fredrick Nasser (Comm.). Thomas King, (Biol), Cheryl Watson. (Biol)

Meeting called to order at 3:05 p.m. by President Best in Founders Hall.

I. Approval of Minutes of 11/20/00

(Wolfe/Martin-Troy). Passed Unanimously

II. Announcements

    1. AAUP Report. Sen. Harmon in Sen. Austad’s absence.
    2. Table Talk is issued the Thursday after every meeting by the representatives of Eastern Connecticut State. The last was of little substance as the contracts had only just been released (available at http://www.ccsu.edu/aaup/csu/) but a new Table Talk will be issued this Thursday or Friday to reflect the latest round. Negotiations have been scheduled all through January. The committee to address part time grievances (V.P. Bartelt, Donna Munroe, John Harmon and Carol Austad) continues to meet and the progress made will be announced soon.

    3. Board Of Trustees Report. Sen. Abadiano

The Board of Trustees met last Friday (December 8) in Hartford

Report posted as part of these minutes.

 

NOTES* on the BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETING
December 8, 2000

Connecticut State University System

President Judd’s Report

Progress has been made on the following goals:

  • Secure authorization to offer Ed.D.
  • Prioritize and improve faculty resources
  • Continue to implement training for information technology; Assist faculty to integrate information technology and encourage participation in distance learning
  • Assess CCSU internal information technology services and work with system office to coordinate technology efforts and Banner implementation
  • Continue to implement university Master Plan

Finance and Administration

  • The Board approved Resolution Concerning FY2001-2002 Tuition and Fees Schedules for CSU Students which stipulates increases in tuition, course fees, the university general fee, the university fee, the information technology fee, housing, and food service fees (see attached for CCSU).
  • The Board approved Resolution Concerning the Use of Operating Funds by CCSU to Acquire a Parcel of Land in New Britain, CT.

The piece of land is located along East Street adjacent to property currently under the care of CCSU. CCSU would like to relocate the Child Care Program to this location and use the CCP’s current location to construct a new parking garage.

 


*Notes are selected information from the BOT meeting focused on items concerning CCSU. If anyone is interested in the minutes of the entire BOT meeting, I will make a copy available upon request. Most interesting points appeared to be that President Judd addressed the issues of construction and EDD approval. Both appeared to enjoy favorable reception. Fees were approved across the system all areas (Tuition, library, facilities etc) and finally operational funds were approved for central to buy land in Newington on east Street (for day care use and a parking garage).

Questions:

All: Where is this land?

Sen. Abadiano: Quoted location noted in BOT minutes above.

c. Sen. Braverman. Wednesday 5-7 p.m. All-University Festival of Lights in front of Maria Sanford will be held. Hot Choc, Music and a light spectacular guaranteed!

 

III. Elections

Vacancies: Sharon Braverman. An election to the University Athletics Board was held. 20 candidates were on the ballot (Meg Leake withdrew her name for election at the meeting).

At the second round of voting: Gail Cueto was elected.

IV. Senate Committee Reports

Curriculum Committee. Paul Petterson Chair.

Curriculum Committee minutes are presented at the end of these minutes owing to length.

Questions:

Sen. Crundwell: Will this bridging/linkage affect teaching loads?

P.Petterson: No it will be treated as part of one’s current load

Sen. Rohinsky: Will enrollments be considered in allocating courses?

P.Petterson: Link and Bridge combined will be used to assess enrollment numbers.

Sen. Crundwell: In the minutes, BIO 496 reads: Study of the molecular reactions that sustain life in connection to their role in biological systems. Structure and function of biomolecules. Bioenergetic principles involved in the synthesis and degradation of biological macromolecules. Integration and regulation of metabolic pathways will be discussed.

CHEM 454 Biochemistry reads: General principles of biochemistry, chemical constituents of cells, metabolic pathways, energies and biochemical regulators. Are they therefore not the same course?

King: Yes they are the same but the prerequisites are significantly different (they require Bio prerequisites) and the course viewed in this light. Indeed three courses are required before Bio 496 can be taken.

Sen. Crundwell: This is acceptable.

Motion to accept Curriculum Committee report.(Martin-Troy/Larkin)

Carried Unanimously

 

    1. Old Business

 

State Ethics Commission. T. Moran representing D.Blitz

The issue of ethics arose in the 1970’s. Originally a criminal matter it was seen that a method of evaluating ethical conduct needed an administrative agency to allow unethical conduct to be pursued in civil court. It is necessary to view the letter from the General counsel as a response to issues that have arisen based on actual cases.. She noted codes are stricter in the public sector as there appears to be a greater need to guard the State, guard those at risk and guard the weak, and hence this reflect legislative and administrative determination to restrain faculty. Two areas seem problematic:

Texts and Payment for book reviews.

Two options are possible to allay fears that faculty are NOT ethically suspect and live within the guidelines:

    1. Ask legislators to change the legislation
    2. Change dominium from its current low figure ($100.00 ?) to something more reasonable ($ 500?).

Comments/Questions:

Sen. Harmon: The defining point is "No personal gain" and hence can give to department, scholarships whatever as long as there is no personal gain.

Sen. Abadiano: What about when one’s department recommends your text?

Sen. Harmon: As long as you were not part of the decision-making on the recommendation.

Sen. Crundwell: Can we change the code in concert with other colleges?

Sen. Moran. She will suggest this to D. Blitz.

Sen. Martin-Troy: The higher minimum seems doable.

Se. Moran. She will ask D. Blitz to keep this under advisement.

    1. New Business

a. Departmental Evaluation Committees

The following was distributed at the meeting:

-----Original Message-----

From: Bartelt, Pearl (AcaAffrs)
Sent:
Tuesday, November 21, 2000 6:34 PM
To:
Judd, Richard (PresOffice)
Cc:
Best, Felton (Phil); Munroe, Donna (Personnel); Wilton, Wendy (PresOffice); Johnson, Monica (AcaAffairs)

Subject: DEC

Toni Moran and I started talking about the way we finalize the DEC's for departments. What prompted this conversation was the number of times we had to go back to you with changes last year. Felton and I met and then asked Donna to come into the meeting to make sure she was comfortable with what we were suggestion. Monica helped as well. Before we bring this to the Senate, we want to make sure that you are comfortable with this procedure. It has always been very rushed to solidify the DEC's to make sure that they are in place by the contractual date of September 15 when they "shall inform any full-time members of their department who meet the standards specified for promotion." (4.11.3)

Department DEC membership to the Academic Dean by April 15

Dean notifies Academic VP of DEC membership and notifies Faculty Senate of members recommended for DEC's outside of their departments by April 30.

Faculty Senate takes action on DEC's and forwards to Academic VP by May.

Full information on DEC's delivered to the President by end of May or beginning of June (depending on date of Senate action).

There will probably be some changes in DEC's but that happens already. This way the DEC would be ready to go immediately in the Fall. It would also permit us to inform the DEC, rather than the chairpersons as we now do, about the DEC training session with Donna, AAUP President and Academic VP.

Let us know what you think.

President Best indicated that the memo had subsequently been seen by both AAUP Pres. Carol Austad and President Judd and both had concurred with the change seeing no problem.

V.P Bartelt added that the overall intent was to get a Final list to the President prior to fall semester.

Sen. Martin-Troy wanted to know who will action this change?

V.P Bartelt indicated that the change was of significant benefit to her responsibilities and therefore would undertake to action this item at the appropriate time. She added that one significant benefit to faculty was that now she will be able identify personally who to invite for training in the fall.

Motion to ratify the changes (Moran/Martin-Troy)

Carried Unanimously

    1. Ad Hoc Committee on Informational Technology. Sen. Altieri .The following was presented:

TO: Felton Best, President of the Faculty Senate

FROM: The ad hoc committee to consider the establishment of a standing committee on information technology
P. Altieri, D. Blitz, T. Burkholder, S. Evon, A. Jackson, C. Penniman, B. Sponder, P. Resetarits, R. Temple

RE: Report of the Committee  

DATE: December 4, 2000

Functions of the committee:

  • to establish strategies for the use of information technology to further the teaching and research goals of faculty
  • to establish and assess policies for the use of information technology resources in an academic environment - in class, between classes and online
  • to serve as a faculty advocate and provide advice to Information Services, the Media Center and the library
  • To suggest areas for training of faculty in the use of information technology
  • to foster the use of information technology as a means of improving communication and a sense of community among the faculty
  • to identify and disseminate best practices in the educational use of information technology
  • to contribute to the university’s strategic plan and identify priorities for faculty use of technology

Membership in the committee:

Area Number of Members

School of Business

2

School of Education

2

School of Technology

2

School of Arts and Sciences

 
 

Natural Sciences- Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Geography, Physics/ES

2

 

Social and Behavioral Science - Anthropology, Criminology/Criminal Justice, Communication, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and Soc Work

2

 

Humanitie - English, History, Modern Languages, Philosophy

2

 

Fine Art - Art, Music, Theater, Graphic Design

2

 

Mathematics/Computer Scienc - Mathematics, Computer Science

2

Library

1

Administrative Faculty

2

Library Technology Coordinator (ex officio)

1

Information Services (ex officio)

1

Media Center director (ex officio)

1

   

Total

22

 

Sen. Altieri indicated that the major issue seemed to be the number of members per department/discipline, based on need, plus the need for ex-officio representation/ expertise, particularly in the case where the area is not represented on the faculty senate. Questions:

Sen. Jones. Could not part-time faculty be represented given their need?

Sen. Altieri. Yes this could be considered.

Sen. Crundwell. Do you have meeting times as yet?

Sen. Altieri: No not yet.

President Best: Given the advances made in selection of members it is now appropriate to refer this to the Committee on Committee’s to study and bring back to the senate.

Sen. Altieri agreed to work with this referral and bring back at a subsequent date.

    1. Academic Integrity Sen. Moran.

Agenda quoted this request:

The ad hoc committee on academic integrity would like to ask for some time on the Senate's agenda as soon as possible in order to ascertain the "sense of the community" on the issues they have been discussing. They would like the agenda to reflect that a significant amount of time (30 minutes?) has been allocated for the discussion of three questions regarding academic honesty:

1) What issues regarding academic honesty are important today;

2) How should violations of academic honesty policies be handled and by whom?

3) What do we need to know about national trends in this field?

The following was the ensuing discussion:

Sen. Moran asked the body to discuss the issue of academic integrity on campus. She explained that the problem had come to our attention last year and an ad hoc committee met to determine what actions, if any, should be taken by the Senate. The committee decided that the problem was more than just cheating or plagiarism, but rather involved the whole idea of a campus culture that tolerates dishonesty. The ad hoc committee requested time to discuss the issue with the Senate and solicit opinions on this subject. Kathy Martin suggested that senators should go and discuss the issue(s) with individual department s and bring opinions back to the committee. Gloria (anthropology) suggested the establishment of a chat room to discuss the issue and solicit the widest possible involvement in the conversation. A number of difficult issues were mentioned: 1) The campus judicial system is designed to deal with student social misbehavior rather than academic misconduct. Faculty don’t really understand the system and it is difficult to use in academic situations; 2) What to do with students who repeatedly cheat or plagiarize in different courses or across departments. One senator suggested the use of a STEP system that is in place at the University of Minnesota. A campus wide committee adjudicates all cases of academic misconduct and keeps records of incidents. This system is something like a "3 strikes, you’re out" system. 3) the appropriate role for the Academic Standards in this discussion was raised; 4) The problem of timing was identified – there are different methods of dealing with students who cheat/plagiarize within the semester and at the end of the semester; 5) How do we create policies that are enforceable? 6) Academic integrity includes both cheating and plagiarism but this conversation has centered on plagiarism. One senator asked if that signified no increase in cheating or that faculty members are comfortable with confronting cheating; 7) President Best encouraged the establishment of a chat room for further conversation on this topic and asked all people who had specific ideas to contact either Toni Moran or Emily Chasse.

VIII Adjournment

(Baretta/Wolff)

Passed unanimously

Meeting adjourned at 4.20

NOTE: THERE IS NO DECEMBER 18 MEETING … 

Next Meeting: February 5, 2000 at 3.00 p.m in Founders Hall

The President and all Faculty Senate members wish everyone happy holidays and a happy new year!!!!

Respectfully submitted by Secretary Benfield.

Ho ho ho!!!

 

REVISED 12/11/00 BASED ON FACULTY SENATE ACTION.

 

TO: Felton Best 
        President, Faculty Senate

FROM: Paul Petterson, Chair
              University Curriculum Committee

SUBJ: Curriculum Report
DATE
: 12/06/00 

The Curriculum Committee submits the following Report to the Faculty Senate for consideration at its December 11, 2000 meeting.

 

Department Of Modern Languages

 

Add ML 490, Teaching World Languages II: Language Acquisition in Young Children For Teachers Of World Languages; Prereq.: BS degree in Spanish or state certification in language teaching. Participants will learn about research in the first and second language acquisition of world languages and discuss and apply implications of research findings (including brain research theory) for teaching and learningof world languages. Not open to TESOL students. Summer. Three credits. [G].

Addition of Accelerated Teacher Certification Program In Spanish; Admissions criteria: BS degree in Spanish; minimum 2.70 GPA; satisfactory completion of Praxis1. Total Credits: 45. Summer One: EDF 415, EDT 315, ML428, ML490 (or, if taken in Fall or Spring, ENG 300)= 10 credits. Fall : EDTE 315, EDSC 425, ML429, Spanish course at 400/500 level* = 13 credits. Spring: EDSC 435, ML 440 = 10 credits. Summer Two: RDG 593, SPED 501, 2 Spanish courses at 400/500 level* = 12 credits. * Certification requirements such as PSY 236 or HIST 261/262 may need to be taken instead of the Spanish courses. NOTE: ML428, ML490, RDG 593, and SPED 501 may be applied as 12 credits of electives toward M.S. Program. SPA460, ML428, and ML490 will be the only 400 level courses that may be applied to the M.S. in Spanish, with approval of the advisor.

Revise M.A. in Modern Languages, to; Add Specialization in Hispano-North American Inter-University Master’s Degree in Spanish Language And Hispanic Cultures. Admissions Criteria: Applicants for this degree should have a baccalaureate degreee with a minimum of 24 cr. preparation in Spanish. With approval of the adviser, candidates with sufficient background in a second language may be permitted to include up to two appropriate graduate courses in this language in their program. Certified teachers whose oral and proficiency skills are of sufficient caliber may include up to 6 cr. in professional education in their program. Before being admitted to candidacy, candidates must contact the Department for evaluation of their graduate-level competence in speaking, listening comprehension, reading and writing in Spanish. Special Conditions: Students must complete 9 cr. of their planned program of studies at the University of Salamanca during a six week summer session. Program Description: 30 cr. (Plan A or B) as follows: Core (6 cr.): Span 460 The Structure of Spanish Language. ML 598: Research in Modern Languages. Directed Electives (15 cr.): Literature - Choose 12 cr. from Span 426, 461, 471, 472, 476, 515, 520, 525, 530, 535, 545, 551, 553. Culture and Civilization - Choose 3 cr. from Span 434, 588 , ML 550. Electives (6 - 9 cr.): Selected in consultion with adviser. Capstone (0 - 3 cr.): Span 599 (Plan A) or Comprehensive Examination (Plan B). Nine credits will be transferred as substitutes from the University of Salamanca as electives. No more than 9 credits at the 400 level may be counted toward degree program. 

Department Of Physics and Earth Sciences

Add PHYS 519, Advanced Topics in Physics;

Prereq.: Permission of instructor and student’s advisor. Combination of lecture, discussion, and laboratory work. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of six credits. Three credits. Irregular. [G].

Revision of Master of Science in the Natural Sciences, to; Core Requirements: SCI 500 Science, Technology and Society (3 cr). Either Track I or Track II or Track III. TRACK I : Physics or Earth Science Specialization: 12 to 24 credits. Courses in either Physics or Earth Science as approved by advisor. Cognate: 0-12 cr. Courses in a related field or fields as approved by advisor. Research/Capstone: 3 to 9 cr. RESEARCH (PHYS 598 or ESCI 598) and/or THESIS (PHYS 599 or ESCI 599). Plan A or Plan B. TRACK II : Science Education Specialization (for Certified Elementary and Secondary School Teachers): Professional Education (6-9 cr.): One of the following: EDF 500, 516, 524, 525, 538, 583, and additional courses as approved by the advisor. Science (15-21 cr.): science courses as approved by the advisor. Research (3 cr.): SCI 598/Research In Science Education. Plan A/30 cr. including 3-6 credits of thesis(SCI 599); Plan C/ 33 cr., including Special Project(SCI 595). Note: Plan A is 30 Semester hours including thesis. Plan B is 30 Semester hours and comprehensive exam. Plan C is 33 Semester hours including SCI 595. TRACK III: Chemistry Specialization. Specialization: 15 cr. in Chemistry (12 cr. MUST be at the 500 level). Cognate: Select 6 cr. from BIO, CHEM, EDF*, ESCI, PHYS. *one of EDF 500, 516, 524, 525, 538, 583 as approved by advisor. Capstone: (6 cr.) CHEM 599 Thesis for Plan A.

Revise PHYS 121, General Physics I, to; Prereq.: MATH 115 and MATH 125 (may be taken concurrently); or MATH 121; or MATH 119.

Revise (reinstate) ESCI 502, Planetarium And Observatory Workshop, to; Prereq.: In-service experience in teaching science or permission of the dept. chair. Planetarium and telescope operation and curriculum study at the elementary and secondary school level. Students will create integrated planetarium experiences and design observing obsessions appropriate to various interests and time of year. Three credits. On demand.[G].

Revise Physics Major, B.S. (non-teaching), to; add PHYS 460 to list of required courses.

Revise Earth Science Major, B.S. (non-teaching), to; 30 semester hours in the Earth Sciences are required, including ESCI 121, 122, 123, 129, 178 or 179, and 460. The remaining 13 hours of Earth Science shall be elected from the following: ESCI 218, 221, 222, 278, 330, 342, 421, 424, 430, 431, 442, 450, 462, or Geography 374. In addition, CHEM 121, 122; PHYS 121, 122; and MATH 122 and 221. A concentration is not required, except for those in the General (i.e., non-specific track) program. A year of French, German, or Russian is recommended if graduate study is being contemplated.

Department Of Art 

Revise M.S. in Art Education, to; Add the following to Program Description: "No more than 9 credit hours at the 400 level, as approved by the graduate advisor, may be counted toward the graduate planned program of study."

 

Department of Biological Sciences

Add BIO 505, Molecular Biology; Prereq.: BIO 306 or permission of the department chair. For entering graduate students.Introduction to the structure and function of DNA. Emphasis on approaches currently being used to analyze the expression of genes. Examination of regulated gene expression and its relationship to cellular growth and differentiation. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. No credit given to students with previous credit for BIO 495. Four credits. Irregular. [G]. [c]. NOTE: This is a "bridge" course with BIO 495.

Add BIO 496, Capstone In Biosynthesis, Bioenergetics and Metabolic Regulation; Prereq.:BIO 306 and CHEM 312, or permission of department chair. For advanced undergraduates. Study of the molecular reactions that sustain life in connection to their role in biological systems. Structure and function of biomolecules. Bioenergetic principles involved in the synthesis and degradation of biological macromolecules. Integration and regulation of metabolic pathways will be discussed. Three credits. Irregular. [c].

Add BIO 506, Biosynthesis, Bioenergetics and Metabolic Regulation; Prereq.:BIO 306 and CHEM 312, or permission of department chair. For entering graduate students. Study of the molecular reactions that sustain life in connection to their role in biological systems. Structure and function of biomolecules. Bioenergetic principles involved in the synthesis and degradation of biological macromolecules. Integration and regulation of metabolic pathways will be discussed. No credit will be given to students with previous credit for BIO 496. Three credits. Irregular. [G]. [c]. NOTE: this is a "bridge" course with BIO 496.

 

Add BIO 497, Biosynthesis, Bioenergetics and Metabolic Regulation Laboratory; Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO 496 or BIO 506. Laboratory to accompany BIO 496 or BIO 506. One three-hour laboratory per week. One credit. Irregular. [G]. [c].

Revise BIO 490, Studies in Biology, to;

BIO 490, Topics In Biology. Prereq.: BIO 201 and 202, or permission of department chair; junior status required. For advanced undergraduates. Selected topics in the biological sciences. Lectures, seminars, discussions, independent readings, reports and laboratory work as appropriate for the topic will be utilized. Four credit hour offerings will include one three-hour laboratory per week. May be repeated with different topics. Three to four credits. Irregular. [c]. Remove [G] designation.

Revise BIO 495, Molecular Biology, to;

BIO 495, Capstone In Molecular Biology. Prereq.: BIO 306 or permission of department chair. For advanced undergraduates. Introduction to the structure and function of DNA. Emphasis on approaches currently being used to analyze the expression of genes. Examination of regulated gene expression and its relationship to cellular growth and differentiation. Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Four credits. Irregular. [c]. Remove [G] designation.

Department of Chemistry

 

Revise Major in Chemistry, B.S. (Certifiable for secondary teaching), to; This program is designed for those students seeking state certification for teaching chemistry at the secondary level and includes a student-teaching component in the senior year at an area school. 36 credits in Chemistry, as follows: CHEM 121, 122, 301, 311, 312, 321, 322, 323, 402 and 460. In addition, students must take BIO 121; PHYS 125, 126; SCI 420; MATH 121, 122, 221; and 1 credit of science electives approved by the chair. 30 credits also must come from the following courses which require prior acceptance into the Professional Program in the School of Education and Professional Studies: SPED 315; EDTE 315; EDF 415; EDSC 425, 435; RDG 440; SCI 416, 417, 419. For students contemplating graduate work, a year of German or Russian is recommended. Students who major in Chemistry are not required to complete a minor, but are urged to minor in General Science.

 

Department Of English

Add ENG 548, Advanced Studies in American Literature; Selected topics in American literature. May be taken under different topics for a maximum of 6 credits. No credit given to students who have taken the same topic in ENG 448. Three credits. Fall, Spring. [G]. NOTE: this is a "link" course with ENG 448.

Add ENG 558, Advanced Studies in British Literature; Selected topics in British literature. May be taken under different topics for a maximum of 6 credits. No credit given to students who have taken the same topic in ENG 458. Three credits. Fall, Spring. [G]. NOTE: this is a "link" course with ENG 458.

Add ENG 590, Graduate Tutorial: Individual Guided Reading; Prereq.: permission of department chair. A graduate tutorial set up as an independent study for students who wish to pursue intensive, guided research on a particular author or literary period. Three credits. Fall, Spring, Summer. [G].

Revise M.A. in English, to; Admissions requirements: add "receipt of Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university in English and American literature, or with 30 hours of appropriate undergraduate course work in the discipline (as approved by the departmental review)". The Master of Arts degree in English is offered to students who which to devote their program exclusively to the advanced study of English and American literature. The Master of Arts diploma specifies a graduate degree in English, a prerequisite for further graduate work in English. (30 cr.) PLAN A (Thesis): Eng 598 Research in English (literature section)* (3); Eng 500 and 501 Seminar in American and Seminar in British Literature (6); 3-4 500-level English electives as approved by the faculty adviser (9-12 cr.); 2-3 400-level English electives as approved by the faculty adviser (6-9 cr.); Eng 599 Thesis (3). PLAN B (Comprehensive Examination): Eng 598 Research in English (literature section)* (3); Eng 500 and 501 Seminar in American and Seminar in British Literature (6); 4 500-level English electives as approved by the faculty adviser (12 cr.); 3 400-level English electives as approved by the faculty adviser (9 cr.). *To be completed in the first semester of graduate study.

Revise M.S.in English, to; Admissions: add "receipt of Baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university in English and American literature, or with 30 hours of appropriate undergraduate course work in the discipline (as approved by the departmental review)". The Master of Science degree in English is offered to students who wish to pursue advanced study of English and American literature with the possibility of focusing on a particular literary genre or on literary periods. Those who elect this degree program are required to take six credits of education courses outside the Department of English. (36 cr.) All students must take the Comprehensive Examination, which will include at least five questions in literature and two questions on material derived from professional courses offered through the English Department. Professional Education (6-9 cr.): One of thefollowing: EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues; EDF 516 School and Society; EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary theories of Curriculum; EDF 525 History of American Education; EDF 538 The Politics of Education; EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education; and additional courses as approved by adviser. Professional course work, English Department: Two electives as approved by the faculty adviser (6 cr.). Eng 500 and Eng 501, Seminar in American or Seminar in British Literature (6 cr.); Eng 598 Research in English (Lit. section)* (3 cr.); 4-5 English electives as approved by the faculty adviser, with no more than 3 courses on the 400 level (12-15 cr.). *To be completed in the first semester of graduate study.

Add Minor in Language and Computation; 24 credits. An introduction to the human-computer dialogue, focusing on the recognition, production and retrieval of sounds, words, phrases and sentences in human language. Required Courses (15 cr.): ENG 200, Introduction to Linguistics; ENG 312, Introduction to Syntax; ENG 313, Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology; ENG 433, Introduction to Computational Linguistics; ENG 434, Speech and Natural Language Processing . Three of the following electives (9 cr.): ENG 300, PSY 281, CS 290, PHIL 220, STAT 104, MATH 218, ENG 400, CS 407, PHIL 320, STAT 315, ENG 430, CS 462, STAT 451, CS 464, STAT 476, or a course related to the content of the minor and with the consent of an advisor.

Add ENG 312, Introduction to Syntax; Prereq.: ENG 200. Introduction to basic principles of syntactic theory within contemporary grammatical frameworks and how they generate grammatical sentences. Construction of sound syntactic arguments in linguistic theory. Emphasis on English syntax. Three credits. Irregular, On Demand.

Add ENG 313, Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology; Prereq.: ENG 200. Articulation, acoustics, and perception of speech sounds in human language. Patterning and representation of sounds in phonological systems. Phonological processes. Use of the computerized Speech Laboratory. Three credits. Irregular, On Demand.

Add ENG 433, Introduction to Computational Linguistics; Prereq.: ENG 312 and ENG 313. Investigation of computational models of natural language processing for both parsing and production of lexical, phonological and syntatic units, including text to speech. The relationship between linguistic theories and the algorithms that can implement them. Three credits. Irregular, On Demand.

Add ENG 434, Speech and Natural Languages Processing; Prereq.: ENG 312 and ENG 313. Exploration of techniques and methods of human-computer dialogues with primary focus on how computers recognize, parse and produce syntactic, semantic, pragmatic and other discourse-theoretic aspects of human languages such as English. Three credits. Irregular, On Demand.

 

Department Of History

Add HIST 545, History of South Africa since 1900; Focus on South Africa since 1900 with emphasis on the rise and fall of Apartheid and mulitifacted dimensions of the liberation struggle, and the process of democratization. Three credits. Irregular. [G].

Add HIST 395, Topics In History; An intermediate course exploring specific areas of historical inquiry and research. Topics vary. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credits.

Three credits. Irregular. Revise Minor in History, B.A. and B.S, to; 18 credits of History, including HIST 121 or 141, 122 or 143, and 301 or 310. 6 credits must be taken in 400-level courses at Central Connecticut State.

Add HIST 580, Seminar In Non-Western History; Selected problems in historical research specific to areas of the world other than the United States and Europe. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credits. Three credits. Irregular.

Department of Mathematical Sciences

Revise MATH 486, Complex Variables, to; renumber to MATH 526. 

Revise MATH 495, Principles of Real Analysis I, to; renumber to MATH 519.

Revise STAT 451, Applied Stochastic Processes, to; renumber to STAT 551.

Revise STAT 467, Linear Models, to; renumber to STAT 567.

Revise STAT 475, Mathematical Statistics III, to; renumber to STAT 575.

Revise ACTL 483, Review--SOA/CAS Course 3, to; renumber to ACTL 583.

Revise ACTL 484, Review--SOA/CAS Course 4, to; renumber to ACTL 584.

Revise ACTL 466, Actuarial Models II, to; renumber to ACTL 566.

Revise MATH 431, Techniques in Diagnosis and Remediation for the Tchg of Math--K-12, to; renumber to MATH 534. Revise STAT 470, Applied Multivariate Analysis, to; renumber to STAT 570. 

Add Accelerated Teacher Certification Program in Secondary Mathematics; Admission criteria: a) The candidate must qualify for admission to the University's graduate Programs, including a 2.70 minimum GPA. b) The candidate must have completed at least 30 credits in mathematics content courses.c) The candidate must meet all requirements for admission to the Professional Program for Teacher Education including passing scores on Praxis I and an interview with and a positive recommendation by the Acceptance Committee of the Department of Mathematical Sciences. (Contact the Office of the Dean of the School of Education and Professional Studies for details and application materials.) 35 credits. Required courses: EDF 415, RDG 593, EDTE 315, EDSC 425, EDSC 435, SPED 501, MATH 413, MATH 426, MATH 543 (6 credits). Students may also take up to 9 credits in graduate level mathematics courses to complete as much as 21 credits toward a MS degree in Secondary Mathematics during this 14 month program. A maximum of 9 credits at the 400 level may be counted toward the MS degree, upon approval by the faculty advisor.

Revise M.S. in Mathematics for Certified Elementary Teachers, to; Master of Science in Mathematics for Certified Elementary Teachers (Plans A, B, and C are offered as options). The program consists of 30 credits (Plans A and B) or 33 credits (Plan C). No more than 9 credits may be earned in 400-level courses. General Education (0-9 cr.): Elective(s) as approved by faculty advisor. Professional Education (3-9 cr.) One of the following: EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues EDF 516 School and Society EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum EDF 525 History of American Education EDF 538 The Politics of Education EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education, and additional course(s) (0-6 cr.) as approved by advisor. Mathematics Specialization (9-18 cr): department offerings from the following: MATH 404, 441, 442, 446, 449, 505, 531, 532, 534, 580. Capstone: Plan A (30 cr.) includes 21 credits in courses from the above and Applied Statistical Inference, STAT 453, Research in Mathematics, MATH 598 (cr.), and Thesis, MATH 599 (3 cr.). Plan B (30 cr.) includes 24 credits in courses from the above and Applied Statistical Inference, STAT 453, Research in Mathematics, MATH 598 (3 cr.), and a Comprehensive Examination. Plan C (33 cr.) has the same General Education, Professional Education, and Mathematics Specialization requirements as Plan B, except that in place of the Comprehensive Examination, the student must complete an additional 3 cr. course, MATH 590, Special Project in Mathematics.

Revise M.S. in Mathematics for Certified Secondary Teachers, to; Master of Science in Mathematics for Certified Secondary Teachers (Plans A, B, and C are offered as options). The program consists of 30 credits (Plans A and B) or 33 credits (Plan C). No more than 9 credits may be earned in 400-level courses. General Education (0-9 cr.): Elective(s) as approved by faculty advisor. Professional Education (3-9 cr.) One of the following: EDF 500 Contemporary Educational Issues EDF 516 School and Society EDF 524 Foundations of Contemporary Theories of Curriculum EDF 525 History of American Education EDF 538 The Politics of Education EDF 583 Sociological Foundations of Education, and additional course(s) (0-6 cr.) as approved by advisor. Mathematics Major (15-21 cr.): department offerings chosen from four of the following five groups: Group I (Algebra): MATH 469, 473, 515, 516; Group II (Geometry and Topology): MATH 523, 525; Group III (Analysis): MATHJ 463, 491, 519, 520, 526; Group IV (Applied and Computer): MATH 471, 472, 477, 479, and CS 407, 410, 460, 462, 463, 464, 465, 473, 481, 485, 490, 498; Group V (General): MATH 404, 421, 468, 534, 540, 543, 580 and STAT 575. Capstone: Plan A (30 cr.) includes 21 credits in courses from the above and Applied Statistical Inference, STAT 453, Research in Mathematics, MATH 598 (cr.), and Thesis, MATH 599 (3 cr.). Plan B (30 cr.) includes 24 credits in courses from the above and Applied Statistical Inference, STAT 453, Research in Mathematics, MATH 598 (3 cr.), and a Comprehensive Examination. Plan C (33 cr.) has the same General Education, Professional Education, and Mathematics Specialization requirements as Plan B, except that in place of the Comprehensive Examination, the student must complete an additional 3 cr. course, MATH 590, Special Project in Mathematics. Note: Once a graduate student has elected one of the three plans (A, B, or C), any change to one of the other two plans must be made prior to the completion of 21 graduate cr. and requires the approval of the student’s advisor and the appropriate dean.

Revise M.A. in Mathematics, to; Master of Arts in Mathematics This program is designed for those students who wish to expand their knowledge of mathematics beyond the level of undergraduate study, either as preparation for advanced graduate study or to increase their knowledge of mathematics for teaching or to combine a knowledge of higher mathematics with related mathematical sciences and computer science for a career in industry. Applicants to the Master of Arts program are expected to have completed the equivalent of MATH 122, 221, 222, 228, and 366 in addition to any necessary prerequisites for course required in the planned program of graduate study. MA Program in Mathematics (30 cr.). Requirements (18 cr.): MATH 515 Abstract Algebra I; MATH 516 Abstract Algebra II; MATH 519 Principles of Real Analysis I; MATH 520 Principles of Analysis II; MATH 523 General Topology; MATH 526 Complex Variables. Electives as approved by faculty advisor (12-21 cr.). No more than 9 of the above credits may be earned in 400-level courses. Comprehensive Examination. M.A. Program in Mathematics with Specialization in Computer Science (30 cr.) The student will choose a specialization in Computer Programming Techniques and Numerical Methods or Computer Systems and Software Engineering. The student and faculty advisor will work out an appropriate plan of study within the framework of the following requirements. Requirements: Basic Mathematics Courses (12 cr.)— Three (3) of MATH 515, 516, 519, and 520 and one (1) of MATH 523, 526, and STAT 551. Electives appropriate to the area of specialization as approved by the faculty advisor (18 cr.). No more than 9 of the above credits may be earned in 400-level courses. Comprehensive Examination. M.A. Program in Mathematics with Specialization in Statistics, Actuarial Science or Operations Research (Plans A, B, and C are offered as options). The student will choose a specialization in one of the following areas of mathematical science: Statistics, Actuarial Science, or Operations Research. The student and faculty advisor will then work out an appropriate plan of study within the framework of the following requirements. Requirements One of the following two-semester sequences (6-8 cr.): Statistics Specialization: STAT 567 and 575; Actuarial Specialization: ACTL 465 and 566; Operations Research Specialization: STAT 551 and MATH 470. Three courses chosen from the courses listed above or the following (9 cr.): MATH 477, 519, 520, 473. Electives appropriate to the area of specialization (10-15 cr.). No more than 9 of the above credits may be earned in 400-level courses. Plan A: Thesis, MATH 599 (6 cr.), with 27 cr. of course work. Plan B: Comprehensive Exam with 30 cr. of course work Plan C: Special Project in Mathematics, MATH 590 (3 cr.) with 30 cr. of course work. Revise MATH 483, General Topology, to; renumber to MATH 523.

Add STAT 576, Advanced Topics in Statistics; Prereq.: permission of instructor. Seminar in probability theory, sampling theory, decision theory, Bayesian statistics, hypothesis testing, or other advanced area. Topic depending on needs and qualifications of students. May be repeated under different topic to a maximum of 6 credits. Three credits. Spring (O). [G].

Add ACTL 580, Advanced Topics in Actuarial Science; Prereq.: permission of instructor. Seminar in risk theory, basic actuarial principles, actuarial models, actuarial modeling, or other advanced topic. May be repeated under different topic for a maximum of 6 credits. Three credits. Spring. [G].

Department Of Industrial Technology

Add CM 465, Construction Internship; Introduction to the construction workplace. Emphasis on field operations and management applications as they apply to building and heavy/highway construction projects. Three credits. On demand.

Add CM 255, Construction Business Principles; Prereq.: CM 155. Examination of the role of the owner of a construction company. Emphasis on ethical, organizational, financial, legal, managerial and personnel issues. Three credits. Spring. 

Revise IT 254, Construction Quantity Surveying, to; redesignate to CM 135; remove prerequisite. Revise IT 422, Construction Safety, to; redesignate to CM 335; remove prerequisite. 

Revise IT 150, Construction Practices and Principles, to;Redesignate and retitle to: CM 235, Building Construction Systems.

Revise BSIT-Construction Management, to; B.S., Construtction Management. MAJOR: ET 251, Applied Mechanics I (3); ET 405, Applied Structural Systems (3); TC 353, Introduction to Surveying (3); TC 356, Materials of Construction (3); CM 125, Construction Graphics (3); CM 135, Construction Quantity Surveying (3); CML 155, Construction Documents (3); CM 235, Building Construction Systems (3); CM 245, Heavy/Highway Construction Systems (3); CM 255, Construction Business Principles (3); CML 325, Building Construction Estimating (3); CML 345, Heavy/Highway Construction Estimating (3); CM 335, Construction Safety (3); CML 355, Construction Planning (3); CM 435, Construction Superintendency (3); CML 455, Construction Project Management (3); CM 465, Construction Internship (3); Free Electives (0-4). OTHER REQUIRED ELECTIVES(21 cr.): AC 211, Introduction to Financial Accounting (3); MGT 295, Introduction to Management (3); ENG 403, Technical Writing (3); LAW 250, Principles of Law (3); MKT 295, Introduction to Marketing (3); MATH 125, Applied Calculus I (3); TC 113, Information Processing (3). REQUIREMENTS IN GENERAL EDUCATION (46-53 cr.): Study Area I: 9 SH, inc. Literature elective(3) and PHIL 240, Ethical Problems in Business(3); Study Area II: 9 SH – History elective (3) and ECON 200, Principles of Economics I (3) and ECON 201, Principles of Economics II (3); Study Area II: 6 SH, recommended to include PSY 112 (3); Study Area IV: 8 SH - CHEM 121, General Chemistry I (4) and PHYS 121, General Physics I (4); Skill Area 1: 6 SH – ENG 110 (3) and COMM 115 or 140 (3); Skill Area II: 6 SH - STAT 200, Business Statistics I (3) and MATH 115, Trigonometry (3); Skill Area III: 0-6 SH; Skill Area IV: 2-3 SH. NOTE: A total of 122 credits are required for the degreee.

Department Of Music

Add MUS 278, Applied Music for Majors II; Prereq.: MUS 178 (C- or better). Individual instrumental or vocal instruction in performance. Open only to music majors. Fee: $400 per semester. May be repeated for up to 4 credits in any one performing area. Special conditions: demonstrated proficiency at prerequisite level. Two credits. Fall, Spring.

Add MUS 378, Applied Music for Majors III; Prereq.: MUS 278 (C- or better). Individual instrumental or vocal instruction in performance. Open only to music majors. Fee: $400 per semester. May be repeated for up to 4 credits in any one performing area. Special conditions: demonstrated proficiency at prerequisite level. Two credits. Fall, Spring.

Add MUS 478, Applied Music for Majors IV; Prereq.: MUS 378 (C- or better). Individual instrumental or vocal instruction in performance. Open only to music majors. Fee: $400 per semester. May be repeated for up to 4 credits in any one performing area. Special conditions: demonstrated proficiency at prerequisite level. Two credits. Fall, Spring.

Revise MUS 310, General Music Methods, to; Prereq.: MUS 101 (C- or higher).

 

Department Of Health & Human Service Professions

Revise CNSL 563, Medical Aspects of Rehabilitation Counseling, to; Prereq. : CNSL 561. Credits: 3 (change from 1). Cycling pattern: Spring.

Revise CNSL 561, Advanced Rehabilitation Counseling; Prereq.: CNSL 560. Case management and service coordination services including independent living services, job development and placement of individuals with disabilities. 

Three credits. Fall. Add Advanced Graduate Certificate Program - Professional Counseling (OCP 503); Admission criteria: Master's degree in counseling. Total Credits : 12. The Advanced Graduate Certificate program in Professional Counseling is designed for practicing counselors who already hold a master's degree in counseling and are preparing for state licensure as a Professional Counselor through the State of Connecticut Department of Public Health. A certificate in advanced graduate work in Professional Counseling is issued upon completion of a combination of any 12 credits of selected 500 level courses, with a grade of B or better, designated for the certificate program. 

Revise Baccalaureate Program for Registered Nurses, to; Requirements: Delete NRSE 302, 304, 306, 402, 404, 406; add NRSE 410, 412, 414. Change degree program total to 125 credits. Revise Professional Counseling/Rehabilitation Counseling Program, to; Rehabilitation Counseling: Remove CNSL 562 from Specialization courses; increase Specialization courses credits to 12; increase total credits to 54. Substance Abuse: Remove CNSL 562 from Specialization courses; remove PSY 454 from Specialization courses; add PSY 454 to program prerequisites.

Add NRSE 410, Holistic Family Health Care and Health Promotion Across the Life Span; Prerequisites: NRSE 300,301, and matriculation in the BSN program. Integration, analysis and synthesis of comprehensive theoretical concepts of holistic care across the life span in diverse settings. Must be taken concurrently, consecutively or contiguously with NRSE 412 and 414. Four credits. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Add NRSE 412, Holistic Family Health Clinical Practicum; Prerequisites: NRSE 300,301,303, and matriculation in the BSN program. Application of the nursing process to families ii diverse settings.Emphasis on leadership, delegation, health promotion and complex care based on evidence based practice. Must be taken concurrently, consecutively or contiguously with NRSE 410and 414, or permission of the Coordinator. Four credits. Fall, Spring.

Add NRSE 414, Professional Nursing Role; Prerequisites: Completion of all BSN course work. Synthesis of professional nursing practice from the analysis of selected ethical, social, political, professional and role issues with related field experiences as appropriate. Must be taken concurrently, consecutively or contiguously with NRSE 410 and 412, or permission of the Coordinator. Four credits. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Delete NRSE 302, Pre-Crisis Family and Community Health.

Delete NRSE 304, Practicum in Family and Community Health.

Delete NRSE 306, Professional Transition in Family and Community Health.

Delete NRSE 402, Crisis and Their Resolution in Family and Community Health.

Delete NRSE 404, Advanced Practicum in Family and Community Health.

Delete NRSE 406, Professional Nursing Practice.

Delete CNSL 562, Case Management In Rehabilitation Counseling.

 

ATTACHMENT A: Definitions And Procedures For "Bridge" And "Link" Courses

(see attachment below).

DEFINITIONS AND PROCEDURES FOR "BRIDGE" AND "LINK" COURSES

I. DEFINITIONS (To be listed in Graduate Catalog)

"Bridge" Course – an entry level graduate course which may share lectures with a specific advanced undergraduate (400 level) capstone course. Each of these courses will have different numbers, titles, syllabi and requirements. No credit will be given for those students who have already taken the 400 level course.

"Link" Course – a graduate topics course which may share lectures with a specific advanced undergraduate (400 level) topics course on the same topic. Each of these courses will have different numbers, titles, syllabi, and requirements. No credit will be given for those students who have already taken the 400 level course.

----------------------------------------------

 

II. PROCEDURES (Curriculum Committee)

"Bridge" and "link" courses are created to assist those departments who are unable, after good faith efforts, to restructure their graduate program(s) to meet the 9 credit restriction on 400 level courses without sacrificing the academic integrity of such programs. No program will be allowed to have more than 3 "bridge" or "link" courses (with no more than 2 for either category). Such courses, and the graduate programs proposing them, will be reviewed by an ad hoc committee of the Curriculum Committee Chair, the Graduate Studies Curriculum Subcommittee Chair, the Graduate Studies Committee Chair, and the Graduate Dean. They will then be reviewed by the Graduate Studies Committee and the Curriculum Committee and the Faculty Senate, as per normal Curriculum procedure. If approved, such courses (and their programs) will be reviewed after three years, to determine whether or not the program(s) involved still require their use. PROGRAMS WHICH ARE GRANTED "BRIDGE" OR "LINK" COURSES WILL BE EXPECTED TO WORK IN GOOD FAITH TO RESTRUCTURE THEIR PROGRAMS SO THAT SUCH COURSES ARE NO LONGER NECESSARY FOR THE PROGRAM. Each of these courses will be clearly identified in the Graduate Catalog and in registration materials. 12/06/00 P. Petterson, Curriculum Chair